sat 23/09/2017

Brighton Festival

Hanif Kureishi, Brighton Festival review - a combative, funny and moving talk

Hanif Kureishi and his interviewer Mark Lawson are both wearing black Nike trainers, and long professional acquaintance makes them as comfortable with each other as an old, expensive pair of shoes. Kureishi’s promo tour for his latest novel, The...

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Tristan & Yseult, Brighton Festival review - playful and inventive storytelling

Tristan & Yseult has become something of a calling card for Kneehigh, which was founded in 1980 and is now the unofficial National Theatre of Cornwall. Emma Rice, currently artistic director of Shakespeare's Globe in London, created this...

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Adam Buxton's Bowie Bug, Brighton Festival review - a comic PowerPoint masterclass

It’s a tricky business, approaching comedy on a day when a national tragedy has just occurred. Comedian and broadcaster Adam Buxton is aware of this. It was especially noticeable last night, with his show delayed as a direct result of the Brighton...

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Rich Hall's Hoedown, Brighton Festival review - country comedy trumps hecklers

Brighton is getting a bit above itself tonight. There’s a weird full moon atmosphere in the Theatre Royal, even though it’s not a full moon. At one point, Rich Hall makes a gag wherein he wishes the world were run by women, the brunt of which is...

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The Gabriels, Brighton Festival review - hilarious drama in the shadow of Trump

The subtitle of Richard Nelson’s new trilogy suggests an anti-Trump polemic. Instead, its miraculous, almost invisible craft fulfils the President’s most hollow promise. It restores full humanity to a family of lower-middle class Americans who often...

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An Evening with Picador Poetry, Brighton Festival review - gripping literary showcase fired with sex, politics, and paranoia

Old, young, or somewhere in the middle - people of all ages fill the seats around me and noisily wait for the evening to begin. The Picador Poetry List - home to literary giants like Carol Ann Duffy and Clive James - is celebrating its 20th birthday...

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Meow Meow's Souvenir, Brighton Festival review – subversive but evocative new song-cycle

Dream palace, cesspit and church; celebrated, mopped (by Marlene Dietrich, no less) and fucked: Brighton’s Theatre Royal has seen a whole lot of history, of both the splendid and the seedy variety. Now it has found a magnificent if unlikely...

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m¡longa, Brighton Festival review - sensual tango explosion

Watching tango dancers Gisela Galeassi and Nikito Cornejo own the apron of the stage during the second half of m¡longa, the brain finds it difficult to process what the eyes are seeing. The pair seem to be one writhing, dark-toned dervish of jutting...

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No Dogs, No Indians, Brighton Festival review – poor production shoulders too big a task

A whacking great story has gone largely untold in British theatre: the legacy of colonialism in India, including the cultural ghosts the British left behind. With the 70th anniversary of Indian independence just round the corner this summer, poet...

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Jeremy Hardy, Brighton Festival review - expert raconteur shows political bite

Jeremy Hardy is very happy to mock his audience and they love it. One of the biggest laughs of the night is when a punchline refers to us as a collection of “middle class white people”. Being Brighton, he goes further, explaining how tolerant the...

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Visual art at Brighton Festival - disturbing, playful, but ultimately rudderless

As befits a festival with a spoken word artist as its guest curator, storytelling is at the heart of the visual arts offer in the 2017 Brighton Festival. It is not known if performance poet Kate Tempest had a hand in commissioning these four shows,...

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Casus Circus Driftwood, Brighton Festival review - eye-boggling gymnastic theatre

There is a sequence in theatrical circus troupe Casus’ new production, Driftwood, where three of the five members sit, each between the legs of another, in a row, facing the front of the stage. They look as if they’re about to do the rowing dance...

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