tue 27/06/2017

tv

Who Should We Let In? Ian Hislop on the First Great Immigration Row, review – how history repeats itself

Barney Harsent

Immigration…immigration… immigration… that’s what we need! Not the words of record-breaking, tap-dancing trumpeter Roy Castle, rather it’s the gist of a Times leader from 1853 (admittedly, fairly heavily paraphrased).

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Chance, Universal review – Hugh Laurie is reborn as a film-noir shrink

adam Sweeting

Hugh Laurie, in his new role of forensic neuropsychiatrist Eldon Chance, tells us that he works with those who are “mutilated by life”, and we soon see that Chance himself falls into that category. He’s in the midst of a divorce, he only sees his daughter Nicole at weekends, and his work seems to fill him with a kind of morbid weariness.

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Ripper Street, BBC Two, Series 5 review – apocalypse looms in Victorian Whitechapel

adam Sweeting

There has always been an air of incipient doom hovering over Ripper Street, since the show is more of a laboratory of lost souls than a mere detective drama.

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Murdered For Being Different, BBC Three review - unbearable but unmissable

jasper Rees

Heaven alone knows we have pressing anxieties enough to preoccupy us, but if you the emotional bandwidth to accommodate more, the iPlayer can oblige. Available now on BBC Three is the latest in what now becomes a trilogy of heartrending dramas with Murdered in the title.

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Riviera, Sky Atlantic review - codswallop on the Côte d'Azur

Mark Sanderson

W Somerset Maugham, who knew a thing or two about the dark side, summed up the Riviera as “a sunny place for shady people”. On the evidence of this first episodeRiviera is a funny place for shitty people.

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Fearless, ITV review - Helen McCrory lights up dense conspiracy thriller

jasper Rees

Emma Banville is almost too good to be true: a human rights lawyer who houses Syrian refugees, wins the most hopeless cases of wrongful conviction, won’t be bullied by anyone – coppers, prison wardens, the system. OK she smokes, presumably for the stress, and pints of lager don’t sit quite right in her hand. And she’s trying to adopt a child with, somewhat implausibly, John Bishop.

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The Loch, ITV review - hokum shrouded in Scotch mist

Mark Sanderson

There’s something nasty in Loch Ness – a corpse tied to a curling stone – but, this being tellyland, the real monsters lurk on its shores. The Loch aspires to be a Scottish Broadchurch – Braidkirk? – but, alas, is nothing of the sort.

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Poldark, Series 3, BBC One review - tempestuous passions and pantomime villains ride again

adam Sweeting

Is it always the same bit of Cornish clifftop they gallop along in Poldark? Anyway here it was again, raising the curtain on the third series.

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Summer of Love: How Hippies Changed the World review - the weird and wonderful roots of the Sixties counterculture

adam Sweeting

As the accompanying music reminded us, it's the time of the season for looking back in languor at the psychedelic daze that descended on America's West Coast in 1967. It was an era when one was enjoined, if going to San Francisco, to "be sure to wear flowers in your hair".

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Election Night 2017, BBC One, ITV, Channel 4, Sky News

Barney Harsent

The latest test of the nation’s perseverance and patience – a snap election called just before the negotiations for Brexit are due to start – seemed like an extraordinary act of hubris at the start.

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