fri 24/02/2017

Reviews

A Midsummer Night's Dream, Young Vic

Alexandra Coghlan

“The nine men’s morris is filled up with mud, and the quaint mazes in the wanton green for lack of tread are undistinguishable.” Titania may mourn the landscape withered by her conflict with Oberon, but games and mazes hold no interest for director Joe Hill-Gibbins.

The Swingers, Channel 4

Jasper Rees

Can something be gained in translation? From its title The Swingers promises much. Much more than the original Dutch title Nieuwe Buren, which the caption in the opening credit sequence translates as The Neighbours. Someone in syndication has asked themselves the question: who the hell watches Dutch TV dramas called The Neighbours (aside from captive Dutch audiences)?

Twelfth Night, National Theatre

Alexandra Coghlan

Everybody’s a little bit gay in Simon Godwin’s giddy new Twelfth Night at the National Theatre. From Andrew Aguecheek, vibrant in candy-coloured...

America After the Fall, Royal Academy

Alison Cole

It may be a cliché to say that this is a “timely” exhibition, but America After the Fall invites irresistible parallels with Trump’s America of today...

The Girls, Phoenix Theatre

Matt Wolf

Why? That's the abiding question that hangs over The Girls, the sluggish and entirely pro forma Tim Firth-Gary Barlow musical that goes where Firth's...

Roots, BBC Four

David Nice

Kunta Kinte and his family rivet attention again in well-cast, finely filmed miniseries

Patriots Day

Jasper Rees

Mark Wahlberg stars in solid, pacy but unquestioning account of the Boston bombings

Mirjam Mesak, Kristiina Rokashevich, St Bartholomew the Great

David Nice

Impeccable musicianship and stylish programming from two young Estonians

Juan Diego Flórez, Vincenzo Scalera, Symphony Hall, Birmingham

Richard Bratby

Quiet smiles outweigh high Cs in a recital of two distinct halves

Lost in France

Lisa-Marie Ferla

Nostalgic music documentary gets a hero's welcome at Glasgow Film Festival

Low Level Panic, Orange Tree Theatre

Aleks Sierz

Revival of 1980s feminist comedy is more curiosity than classic

School Play, Southwark Playhouse

Will Rathbone

Debut play makes strong and worthwhile points but lacks depth

The Halcyon, Series 1 Finale, ITV

Mark Sanderson

In which some scores are settled and the Luftwaffe takes a hand

The Wild Party, The Other Palace

Marianka Swain

Gin, skin and sin in a scorching production of a slight musical

Storyville: Life, Animated, BBC Four

Saskia Baron

Insightful documentary about an autistic young man connecting with the world through Disney animations

Aimard, Philharmonia, Salonen, RFH

Gavin Dixon

Unearthed Stravinsky is a revelation, while Ligeti and Ravel dazzle

SS–GB, BBC One

Adam Sweeting

Len Deighton dramatisation depicts the terrors of enemy occupation

Isabelle Faust, Alexander Melnikov, Wigmore Hall

David Nice

Out-of-body sequences in a shimmering, restless programme with Fauré at its heart

Sniper Elite 4

Steve O'Rourke

Life through a long-range lens

Sunday Book: Jake Arnott - The Fatal Tree

Matthew Wright

Delicious, heart-breaking romp through the 1720s underworld

Reissue CDs Weekly: Bizarre

Kieron Tyler

A respectful acknowledgment of Estonia’s post-independence musical pioneers

Hidden Figures

Matt Wolf

Oscar contender is buoyed aloft by its irresistible brio

See Me Now, Young Vic

Aleks Sierz

Real sex workers take the stage for a brilliantly devised show

FLA.CO.MEN, Israel Galván, Sadler's Wells

Hanna Weibye

Maverick dancer opens annual flamenco festival with a playful jam-session of a show

Josh Ritter, St Stephen's Church

Liz Thomson

Solo appearance from artist inspired by desire to 'play messianic oracular honky-tonk'

The Winter's Tale, Royal Lyceum Theatre, Edinburgh

David Kettle

A wonder-filled, child's-eye view of Shakespeare from director Max Webster

Moonlight

Tom Birchenough

Barry Jenkins' brilliant film has a difficult journey of self-realisation at its rich heart

Richard III, Schaubühne Berlin, Barbican

David Nice

More or less a one-man show, but the denouement justifies everything

Le Vin herbé, Welsh National Opera

Stephen Walsh

A 1930s Tristan opera, beautiful and sombre, brilliantly played and sung

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A Midsummer Night's Dream, Young Vic

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