sun 20/08/2017

Reviews

Omar Robert Hamilton: The City Always Wins review - Egypt's revolution, up close and personal

Boyd Tonkin

A few days ago we learned that British taxpayers have unwittingly donated around £1m. in aid to the police and court systems of Egypt’s military dictatorship, via an opaque “Conflict, Stability and Security Fund”. That news only sharpens the topical edge of Omar Robert Hamilton’s debut novel, inspired by his own experience as an activist in Cairo during and after the revolution that began in January 2011. Hamilton helped to found and lead the Mosireen collective.

Reissue CDs Weekly: Blancmange

Kieron Tyler

The Some Bizzare Album was released in January 1981. Compiled by DJ Stevo, it featured twelve unsigned acts he felt represented a fresh way of approaching pop – one enabled by the availability of synthesisers and rhythm machines. Stevo was playing the new music at the nights he hosted, putting the bands on and compiling the electronic chart for the weekly music paper Sounds.

Against, Almeida Theatre review - Ben Whishaw is...

Aleks Sierz

Luke is a Silicon Valley billionaire, a high-tech wizard. And he’s just had a message from God. And what does God say? Well, He says, “Go where there...

Edinburgh Festival and Fringe 2017 reviews round-...

Theartsdesk

Wondering what on earth to choose between as you tramp the streets of the festival? These are our highlights so far.STANDUPAthenu Kugblenu,...

An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power review -...

Demetrios Matheou

When An Inconvenient Truth won the best documentary Oscar 10 years ago, the film’s success marked two significant events: a positive turning point in...

Edinburgh Festival 2017 reviews: Meet Me at Dawn / The Shape of the Pain / Wild Bore

David Kettle

Grief, loss, unending pain - and critics talking out of their backsides

The Hitman's Bodyguard - potty-mouthed, turgid waste of talents

Saskia Baron

Formulaic high-end action movie fails to challenge Samuel L Jackson and Ryan Reynolds

King Lear, Shakespeare's Globe - Nancy Meckler's Globe debut is unusually subdued

Alexandra Coghlan

Kevin R McNally stars in a tragedy so quiet it proves almost inaudible at times

No More Boys and Girls, BBC Two – baby steps lead to great leaps for children

Barney Harsent

A classroom becomes the first battleground for one doctor's war on gender bias

Edinburgh Fringe 2017 reviews: Hannah Gadsby / Suzi Ruffell / Ivo Graham / Athena Kugblenu

Veronica Lee

A possible valediction, class concerns, feeling the privilege, and millennial politics

Edinburgh Festival 2017 review: Andreas Haefliger

David Kettle

A recital that was both frustrating and visionary from the Swiss-born pianist

The Majority, National Theatre review – a minority interest

Aleks Sierz

New play about democracy is entertaining, but a bit too tricksy

Edinburgh Fringe 2017 reviews: Pike St / Box Clever / Sugar Baby

David Kettle

Comedy, tragedy and a whole lot more at Paines Plough's pop-up Roundabout

Quest review - intimate documentary about a north Philly community

Markie Robson-Scott

Jonathan Olshefski's film takes us into the heart of an African-American family

Edinburgh Fringe 2017 reviews: Tom Allen / Cally Beaton / Lauren Pattison / Trumpageddon

Veronica Lee

A happy anniversary, neural pathways, an assured debut, and a deflated Trump

Proms 37 / 38 review: Latvian Radio Choir, Gavrylyuk, BBCSSO, Dausgaard - numinous Rachmaninov triptych

David Nice

Symphony, concerto, chants and Vespers combine for a vintage night at Royal Albert Hall

Edinburgh Fringe 2017 reviews: Kiri Pritchard-McLean / Dad's Army Radio Hour / Elliot Steel

Veronica Lee

Unlikely subject matter for gags, an old favourite revived, and one for the millennials

Final Portrait review - utterly convincing portrayal of an artist at work

Sarah Kent

Geoffrey Rush is the spitting image of Giacometti in Stanley Tucci's fly-on-the-wall portrait

Fred Vargas: The Accordionist review - intriguing Gallic sleuthing yarn

Marina Vaizey

The latest in 'The Three Evangelists' series is as quirky as ever

I Know Who You Are, series finale, BBC Four review - gripping, but no one to root for

Jasper Rees

The mystery of Juan Elías and Ana Saura is resolved, but there's plenty more to sort out. Contains spoilers

Reissue CDs Weekly: Noise Reduction System

Kieron Tyler

Essential round-up of mainland Europe’s mid-Seventies to mid-Eighties musical boundary pushers

Edinburgh Festival 2017 review: The Divide

David Kettle

Alan Ayckbourn's vast dystopian fantasy feels cosy rather than alarming

Proms 34 & 35 review: Oklahoma!, John Wilson Orchestra - music triumphs, words and drama suffer

David Nice

Lopsided results in faithful reconstruction of Rodgers and Hammerstein's groundbreaker

La Bayadère, Mariinsky Ballet review - a parade of delights

Hanna Weibye

Russians save the best till last in lavish display of showmanship and art

Prom 33 review: Davidsen, Gerhardt, BBC Philharmonic, Storgårds - Nordic music glowing with colour

Alexandra Coghlan

A thoughtful mixed programme from one of the BBC's most exciting conductors

A Ghost Story review - spellbinding vision of life, death and time

Markie Robson-Scott

Casey Affleck and Rooney Mara star, but director David Lowery lets the sheet do the talking

theartsdesk on Vinyl 31: Psychic TV, Kendrick Lamar, Brian Eno, Stan Getz and more

Thomas H Green

The most diverse record reviews out there

Tom of Finland review - engaging biopic of gay pioneer

Tom Birchenough

From darkest Helsinki to sunny California, the story of the artist who created a distinctive gay subculture

Edinburgh Fringe 2017 reviews: Tiff Stevenson / Jarlath Regan / Urzila Carlson

Veronica Lee

The politics of beauty, the comedy of organ donation and big laughs from the southern hemisphere

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