wed 28/06/2017

Theatre Reviews

Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill, Wyndham's Theatre review – searing stuff

matt Wolf

Broadway so frequently fetes its visiting Brits that it's nice when the honour is repaid.

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Ink, Almeida Theatre review - The Sun rises while show sinks

aleks Sierz

The recent general election result proves that the power of the rightwing press has diminished considerably in the digital age, but there was a time when media magnate Rupert Murdoch could make grown-up politicians quake in their socks.

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Gloria, Hampstead Theatre review – pretty glorious

matt Wolf

As with life, so it is in art: in the same way that one can't predict the curve balls that get thrown our way, the American playwright Branden Jacobs-Jenkins defies categorisation. On the basis of barely a handful of plays, two of which happen now to be running concurrently in London, this 32-year-old Pulitzer prize finalist seems to embark upon a fresh path with each new venture.

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Terror, Lyric Hammersmith review – more gimmick than drama

aleks Sierz

Can the theatre be a courtroom? A good public place to debate morality and to arrive at profound decisions? You could answer this with a history lesson that ranges from the ancient Greeks to more recent tribunal plays in the 1960s and 1990s.

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Bat Out of Hell, Coliseum review - Jim Steinman's rockin' dystopia hits the stage

adam Sweeting

Opera-lovers coming to St Martin's Lane may feel confused to be confronted by an unrecognisable Coliseum, which now has huge girder-like structures adorning the stage and ceiling and a rather ugly skyscraper looming out of the wings, called Falco Tower.

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Hir, Bush Theatre review – transgender home is sub-prime

aleks Sierz

Donald Trump’s electoral success was, we have been told, fuelled by the anger of the American working class. But how do you show that kind of anger on stage, and how do you criticise its basis in traditional masculinity?

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Kiss Me, Trafalgar Studios review - Richard Bean two-hander is affecting if slight

Will Rathbone

Hampstead Theatre Downstairs' habit of sending shows southward to Trafalgar Studios continues with Richard Bean's Kiss Me. A character study set in post-World War One London, it's a two-hander concerning the attempts of a war widow to conceive a child via an arranged liaison with a younger man...

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Hamlet, Harold Pinter Theatre review - dislocatingly fresh makeover

alexandra Coghlan

Midway through Hamlet a troupe of actors arrives at Elsinore. Coaching them for his own ends, the prince turns director, delivering an impassioned critique: “O! it offends me to the soul to hear a robustious, periwig-pated fellow tear a passion to tatters…it out-herods Herod: I pray you avoid it.” It’s a philosophy director Robert Icke takes as his own watchword. Out goes declaiming, along with...

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Tristan & Yseult, Shakespeare's Globe review - terrific visual and musical élan

Jenny Gilbert

This show feels like an end-of-the-exams party, and in a way that’s exactly what it is.

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Anatomy of a Suicide, Royal Court review - devastatingly brilliant

aleks Sierz

Dorothy Parker’s take on suicide is called “Resumé”: it goes, “Razors pain you; Rivers are damp; Acids stain you; And drugs cause cramp.

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