fri 28/04/2017

Theatre Reviews

City of Glass, Lyric Hammersmith review - ‘thrilling and enthralling Paul Auster adaptation’

aleks Sierz

Playwright Duncan Macmillan has had a good couple of years. In 2015, his play People, Places and Things was a big hit at the National Theatre, winning awards and transferring to the West End.

Read more...

Obsession, Barbican review - Jude Law on serious form in Ivo van Hove's latest

Jenny Gilbert

There is a distinctive look, feel, even sound to a stage production directed by Ivo van Hove, which is becoming rather familiar to London theatregoers after two cult hits, A View From the Bridge and Hedda Gabler.

Read more...

Nuclear War, Royal Court review - ‘deeply felt and haunting’

aleks Sierz

Text can sometimes be a prison. At its best, post-war British theatre is a writer’s theatre, with the great pensmiths – from Samuel Beckett, John Osborne and Harold Pinter to Caryl Churchill, Martin Crimp and Sarah Kane – carving out visions of everyday humanity in all our agonies and glee.

Read more...

The Philanthropist, Trafalgar Studios review - 'Simon Callow's direction is underpowered'

veronica Lee

Christopher Hampton's witty comedy, first performed in 1970, ingeniously inverts Molière's The Misanthrope, centring as it does on a man whose compulsive amiability manages to upset just about everyone.

Read more...

Whisper House, The Other Palace review - 'a delicately calibrated human story struggling to be heard'

Jenny Gilbert

It used to be said that the devil had all the best music. But the devil seems to have lost his touch in this ghost-story rock musical from Duncan Sheik, composer of the stage version of American Psycho and the award-laden Spring Awakening. If the plot seems familiar, it’s because it is – in essence, anyway. An isolated location. Childhood innocence in peril.

Read more...

Guards at the Taj, Bush Theatre review - ‘powerful but ethically troubling’

aleks Sierz

The Bush is back! After a whole year of darkness, the West London new writing venue has reopened its doors following a £4.3million remodelling and refurb, a project close to the heart of its artistic director Madani Younis.

Read more...

Carousel, London Coliseum review - 'Katherine Jenkins is game, Boe out-acted by wig'

David Benedict

“Then I’ll kiss her so she’ll know.” At the sound of his ringing voice, the girls part to reveal him standing there, a hapless monument of rumpled charm. The audience relaxes in pleasure as an easeful actor joyfully shows what you can do with a command of textual detail, physicality and, above all, character. The trouble is, the excellent Gavin Spokes is playing not one of the leads but the supporting role of Mr Snow.

Read more...

The Winter's Tale, Barbican review - Cheek by Jowl's latest wavers in tone

tom Birchenough

This is a well-travelled Winter’s Tale. Declan Donnellan has long been a director who's as much at home abroad as he is in the UK, and with co-production support here coming pronouncedly from Europe (there's American backing, too), Cheek by Jowl have made it abundantly clear where they stand on the issue of the day.

Read more...

The Goat, or Who Is Sylvia?, Theatre Royal Haymarket review - 'Damian Lewis devastates'

Heather Neill

Asked in an interview if there remained any taboos in the theatre, Edward Albee answered, “Yes. I don’t think you should be allowed to bore an intelligent, responsive, sober audience”.

Read more...

Expensive Shit, Soho Theatre, review - 'strong but slender'

aleks Sierz

It’s hot. Real hot. And you’re dancing, just lost in music. You’re at the legendary Shrine nightclub in Lagos, where Afrobeat star Fela Kuti is king. It’s 1994. And it’s hot. Sweat is just pouring off you, no longer in little trickles but soaking through your clothes. And still you dance.

Read more...

Pages

Subscribe to theartsdesk.com

Thank you for continuing to read our work on theartsdesk.com. For unlimited access to every article in its entirety, including our archive of more than 10,000 pieces, we're asking for £2.95 per month or £25 per year. We feel it's a very good deal, and hope you do too.

To take an annual subscription now simply click here.

And if you're looking for that extra gift for a friend or family member, why not treat them to a theartsdesk.com gift subscription?

latest in today

in vain, London Sinfonietta, Lubman, Royal Festival Hall

If Georg Friedrich Haas’s in vain was a work of political protest when it premiered in 2000, in 2017 it’s a piece that reads more like a...

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol 2 review - complacent, tedious,...

The original Guardians of the Galaxy from 2014 had a freshness to its humour and introduced audiences to a set of novel characters;...

The Good Fight review - 'flawless writing and acting...

If Robert King and Michelle King, creators of The Good Wife, took the Joss Whedon line on...

The Promise review - genocide reduced to melodrama

The Armenian genocide by the Ottomans during and after...

CD: Mary J Blige - Strength of a Woman

Mary J Blige has a voice that was built to age gracefully. Gutsy, churchy, sometimes rough, it was miles away from the over-...

City of Glass, Lyric Hammersmith review - ‘thrilling and ent...

Playwright Duncan Macmillan has had a good couple of years. In 2015, his play People, Places and Things was a big hit at the National...

Janina Fialkowska, Wigmore Hall

You wouldn’t guess it from her name, but Janina Fialkowska isn’t actually Polish. You wouldn’t guess from her...

Lady Macbeth review - 'memorably nasty'

The Scottish play’s traces are faint in this bloody, steamy tale of ...

Folk Singer Shirley Collins' Pick of Brighton Festival...

Shirley Collins was one of the Sixties British folk music...

Heal the Living review - 'lots of emotion, not enough l...

Three teenage boys meet at dawn. One of them, blonde and beautiful Simon (Gabin Verdet), jumps out of his girlfriend’s window and rides his bike...