sat 26/09/2020

CD: Paul Weller – Saturns Pattern | reviews, news & interviews

CD: Paul Weller – Saturns Pattern

CD: Paul Weller – Saturns Pattern

Weller serves up some fine summery tunes with a hefty dash of psychedelia

Saturns Pattern: no disappointment

Whether you view him with reverence as the Modfather or rather more sneeringly as the King of Dad Rock, there is no doubt that Paul Weller is a bone fide musical icon. Thirty-eight years after the Jam’s debut, In the City, there is still a sense of anticipation for many each time he releases a new album and Saturns Pattern is certainly no disappointment.

Whether you view him with reverence as the Modfather or rather more sneeringly as the King of Dad Rock, there is no doubt that Paul Weller is a bone fide musical icon. Thirty-eight years after the Jam’s debut, In the City, there is still a sense of anticipation for many each time he releases a new album and Saturns Pattern is certainly no disappointment.

“White Sky”, a collaboration with Manchester space-cases Amorphous Androgynous kicks things off, and initially comes on in a wash of swirling ambient spaceyness. It soon explodes into a howling blues rock stomper though, with Paul barking “White sky falling down on me” over a muscular groove that is periodically interspersed with psychedelic textures and off-kilter electronica sounds. It certainly grabs the attention and suggests that the 56-year-old Weller still has plenty up his sleeve.

However, with the exception of the similarly acid-spiked “In the Car” and the up-tempo pub-rock-with-bite of “Long Time”, the rest of Saturns Pattern calms down considerably and is largely characterised by breezy tunes of guitar pop and good vibes with a psychedelic tinge. “Going my Way” is a lovely, laid-back tune with wistful vocals, while “Pick it up” is a funky groove with jazzy splashes that drops in Spanish guitar flourishes and a Hammond organ edge. “I’m Where I Should Be” brings to mind the more mellow end of David Bowie’s recent The Next Day album and the title track even throws some folk-rock into the mix.

While Saturns Pattern may not be as challenging as 2010’s Wake Up The Nation or the earlier 22 Dreams, it’s certainly no return to the plodding Dad Rock years. Instead, it offers a potent and often cosmic brew, played by a band that is clearly having a ball.

It certainly grabs the attention and suggests that the 56-year-old Weller still has plenty up his sleeve

rating

Editor Rating: 
4
Average: 4 (1 vote)

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