wed 26/09/2018

Reviews

Poet in da Corner, Royal Court review - mind-blowing energy plus plus plus

Aleks Sierz

There was once a time when grime music was very angry, and very threatening, but that seems a long time ago now. Today, Dizzee Rascal is less a herald of riot and revolt, and more of a national treasure, exuding charm from every pore, even if his music has become increasing predictable and safe. But, as wordsmith and dancer Debris Stevenson proves in her debut play, Poet in da Corner, Dizzee Rascal still can change minds and influence people.

Queen of the World, ITV review - born to run and run

Marina Vaizey

Awesome numbers: over a million miles, the equivalent of 42 times around the globe, have been traversed by Her Majesty the Queen, enabling visits over the past seven decades or so to 117 different countries. No one has reigned longer nor travelled further.

Das Rheingold, Royal Opera review - high drama...

Gavin Dixon

Keith Warner’s production of Wagner's Der Ring des Nibelungen was first seen at Covent Garden between 2004 and 2006, and is now back for a third and...

Turner Prize 2018, Tate Britain review - a...

Sarah Kent

I’ve just spent four hours in the Turner Prize exhibition at Tate Britain. The shortlisted artists all show films or videos, which means that you...

Bodyguard, BBC One, series finale review -...

Jasper Rees

And breathe. Bodyguard – not, as even some careless BBC broadcasters keep calling it, "The Bodyguard" – careered to a conclusion as if hurtling...

Lammermuir Festival 2018 review - a bigger buzz

David Kettle

East Lothian's award-winning festival continues to challenge, provoke and illuminate

Courtauld Impressionists: From Manet to Cézanne review - much loved treasures, seen afresh

Marina Vaizey

Favourite paintings from the Courtauld Gallery reveal the collector's eye

Neil MacGregor: Living with the Gods review - focuses of belief

Marina Vaizey

Understanding the impulses behind faith, at a time when faith is being distorted

Reissue CDs Weekly: Bobbie Gentry

Kieron Tyler

‘The Girl From Chickasaw County’ is an enlightening box set dedicated to the ‘Ode to Billie Joe’ hitmaker

Lavinia Greenlaw: In the City of Love’s Sleep review - curated lives

Katherine Waters

Falling in love in middle age and the complexities of responsible lives

The Little Stranger review - the wrong sort of chills

Jasper Rees

Sarah Waters' haunted-house yarn from the maker of Room will leave you cold

Matangi/Maya/M.I.A. review - not your average popstar

Owen Richards

From asylum-seeker to Grammy-winner, documentary reveals the activist behind the music

I object, British Museum review - censorship, accidental?

Katherine Waters

Exhibition on dissidence and subversion doesn't allow objects to speak for themselves

Eyam, Shakespeare's Globe review - plague drama, dark and loose

Tom Birchenough

Back to the 17th century: the village that cut itself off to die

A Discovery of Witches, episode 2, Sky 1 review - when the sorceress met the vampire

Adam Sweeting

Supernatural chills and thrills in TV version of the 'All Souls Trilogy'

Henry V, Tobacco Factory Theatres, Bristol review - the pity of war

Mark Kidel

A strikingly contemporary take on a humanity's addiction to conflict

Katherine Ryan, Garrick Theatre review - feminism with extra sass

Veronica Lee

A laugh-heavy hour from the Canadian

Faces Places review - Agnès Varda's enchanted journey

Tom Birchenough

With photographer JR, the great French documentarist journeys through her homeland

The Outsider, Print Room at the Coronet review - power in restraint

Rachel Halliburton

The spirit of Magritte pervades this brand of existentialism

Heathers The Musical, Theatre Royal Haymarket review - a sardonic take on teen angst

Marianka Swain

Death and all his frenemies descend on a vicious American high school

David Crosby & Friends, Shepherd’s Bush Empire, review - still spine-tingling at 77

Ellie Porter

The singer-songwriter rifles through a long back catalogue from the Byrds through CSN to his new output

Never Here review - conceptual art may damage your health

Adam Sweeting

Echoes of Hitchcock haunt debut feature about voyeurism and obsession

Isouard's Cendrillon, Bampton Classical Opera review - stepsisters shine in fairy-tale bagatelle

David Nice

Maltese-French composer's Cinders opera is mostly routine, but performed with esprit

The Human Voice, Gate Theatre review - unrelenting and sad

Katherine Waters

The end of the line at the end of a telephone line

Ian Bostridge, Thomas Adès, Wigmore Hall review - haunting, brutal Schubert

Gavin Dixon

A Winterreise of psychological intensity, but too often taken to ghoulish extremes

Strangers, episode 2, ITV review - conspiracy theories multiply

Adam Sweeting

Hong Kong locations may be the real stars of this tortuous thriller

The Prisoner, National Theatre review - Peter Brook's latest falls sadly flat

David Kettle

The British master-director settles for vaguely Beckett-inflected bafflement

Parsifal, Saffron Opera Group review - drama and focus

Gavin Dixon

Amateur company continues its run of dramatically compelling Wagner

War and Peace, Welsh National Opera review - an Operation Barbarossa that comes off

Stephen Walsh

Not quite a masterpiece but a great aural and visual spectacle

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Much has been made of Iceman’s characters speaking the ancient Rhaetic dialect, unsubtitled, but that’s never a problem:...

Poet in da Corner, Royal Court review - mind-blowing energy...

There was once a time when grime music was very angry, and very threatening, but that seems a long time ago now. Today, Dizzee Rascal is less a...

Queen of the World, ITV review - born to run and run

Awesome numbers: over a million miles, the equivalent of 42 times around the globe, have been traversed by Her Majesty...

Das Rheingold, Royal Opera review - high drama and dark come...

Keith Warner’s production of Wagner's Der Ring des...

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Courtauld Impressionists: From Manet to Cézanne review - muc...

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