tue 02/03/2021

Opera reviews, news and interviews

Tony and the Young Artists, Royal Opera/Liebeslieder Waltzes, Blackheath Halls online review - love and joy

David Nice

Young performers seeking platforms for their careers have had it especially rough over the past year, most slipping through the financial-support net and now facing the further blow of the Brexit visa debacle. So it’s always good to welcome quality streamings supporting their progress.

Der Freischütz, Bavarian State Opera online review – marksmen as marketeers

Gavin Dixon

Bavarian State Opera has led the way for live performances and associated broadcasts during the pandemic. Their series of weekly “Montagsstück” events have presented innovative chamber operas, specifically for web streaming. Their next goal is full-size opera with a live audience. That is not possible yet, so instead they are premiering a new production of Weber’s Der Freischütz.

 

Hansel and Gretel, Scottish Opera online -...

David Nice

Christmas isn’t just for Christmas, Daisy Evans’s bargain-basement fir-trees-and-tinsel production of Humperdinck’s evergreen masterpiece seems to be...

Classical musicians on life after Brexit - 4:...

Nicky Spence

Forget the pandemic, it's Brexit which could ring the death knell for artists who are currently hoarse from begging to be taken seriously as a...

Netrebko, Met Stars Live in Concert online review...

Miranda Heggie

Though the global pandemic has brought about an unprecedented degree of isolation, it’s also, in unusual ways, brought us together too. Visiting New...

The Turn of the Screw, OperaGlass Works online review - the fright is in the filming

David Nice

Britten’s chamber opera chills in camerawork and high musical values

Holy Sonnets/The Heart's Assurance/A Charm of Lullabies, English Touring Opera online review - darkest hours

Boyd Tonkin

Strikingly staged song-cycles of unease by Britten and Tippett

Romances on British Poetry / The Poet's Echo, English Touring Opera online review - Britten and Shostakovich in a double mirror

Richard Bratby

Two composers add up to one compelling drama, as ETO cuts its cloth to suit the times

Best of 2020: Opera

David Nice

With no touching from mid-March onwards, this art-form was hard hit - but ingenuity ruled

Royal Opera Christmas Concert online review – pajama party around the Nutcracker tree

David Nice

Vivacious opera and cheesy carols under the lively baton of Mark Wigglesworth

Pagliacci, Opera Ensemble, Longborough review - stripped down but live

Stephen Walsh

Finding the essence of a minor masterpiece

Così fan tutte, Scottish Opera online review - wit and deception in an empty theatre

Christopher Lambton

Am-dram props and loose directorial ends don't faze a team of fine young singers

First Person(s): soprano Susan Bullock and baritone William Dazeley on filming Britten’s Owen Wingrave

Susan Bullock And William Dazeley

Grange Park Opera makes the most of Covid restrictions by producing a TV opera

L'enfant et les sortilèges, VOPERA, LPO, Reynolds online – Ravel and Colette reimagined

David Nice

Through the laptop screen and what the child found there, in a brilliant take on a classic

The Seven Deadly Sins, Opera North online review - viscerally thrilling

Jenny Gilbert

Kurt Weill and Bertolt Brecht's indictment of capitalism in a vibrant new production

Ariodante, Royal Opera online review – stylish, but confined

David Nice

Accomplished ensemble tries its best to cross the footlights in livestream-only Handel

‘Our whole industry is supported by vulnerable freelance creators': Chen Reiss on the artist in a time of Coronavirus

Chen Reiss

The soprano, now on screen in the Royal Opera 'Ariodante', on recognition for performers

Bluebeard's Castle, LSO, Rattle, LSO St Luke's online review - slow-burning magnificence

Graham Rickson

Perfectly cast, perfectly played concert performance of Bartók’s early masterpiece

The Magic Flute, Glyndebourne review - deeply moving light in darkness

David Nice

Ninety minute concert staging showcases superb young singers

Meet the Young Artists Week recital, Linbury Theatre – four big personalities

David Nice

Frissons and high drama from Royal Opera acolytes in song

4/4, Royal Opera review – desire, loss and lunacy in four surprising acts

David Nice

Allan Clayton and Richard Jones are kings of bedlam, but the rest has high style too

First Person: tenor Nicky Spence on working with Blackheath locals on screen Stravinsky

Nicky Spence

'The Rake's Progress' distilled and introduced by its star and community opera patron

Fidelio, Garsington Opera review - heart of darkness, light-filled liberation

David Nice

Fine singers equalled by Philharmonia soloists in revelatory chamber-music Beethoven

Eavesdropping on Rattle, the LSO and Bartók’s Bluebeard

David Nice

Ahead of the London Symphony Orchestra’s streaming next month, a privileged preview

La bohème, Scottish Opera – pandemic Puccini

Christopher Lambton

Top-quality cast and players put on a potted version in a parking lot

The Royal Opera: Live in Concert review - Italianate fizz with a patch of flatness

David Nice

A glorious orchestra and chorus under their inspiring music director are back in style

Sāvitri, Lauderdale House review - death and life in a Highgate garden

David Nice

Hampstead Garden Opera works a little miracle with Holst's mystical music-drama

The Encore, Opera Holland Park review - stylish return for a squad of old friends

Boyd Tonkin

A moving and delightful al fresco feast of opera favourites

Heart's Delight, Opera Holland Park review - a classy hour of operetta pops

David Nice

Five fine singers and a small orchestra deliver hits at a high level

Footnote: a brief history of opera in Britain

Britain has world-class opera companies in the Royal Opera, English National Opera, Welsh National Opera, Scottish Opera and Opera North, not to mention the celebrated country-house festival at Glyndebourne and others elsewhere. The first English opera was an experiment in 1656, as Civil War raged between Cromwell and Charles II, and it was under the restored king that theatre and opera exploded in London. Henry Purcell composed the masterpiece Dido and Aeneas (for a girls' school) and over the next century Handel, Gluck, J C Bach and Haydn came to London to compose Italian-style classical operas.

Hogarth_Beggars_Opera_1731_cTateHowever, the imported style was challenged by the startling success of John Gay's low-life street opera The Beggar's Opera (1728), a score collating 69 folk ballads, which set off a wave of indigenous popular musical theatre (pictured, William Hogarth's The Beggar's Opera, 1731, © Tate). Gay built the first Covent Garden opera house (1732), where three of Handel's operas were premiered, and musical theatre and vaudeville flourished as an alternative to opera. Through the 19th century, London became a hub for visiting composers and grand opera stars, but from the meshing of "high" and "popular" creativity at Sadler's Wells (built in 1765) evolved in time a distinct English tradition of wit and social satire in the "Savoy" operas of Gilbert and Sullivan.

In the 20th century Benjamin Britten's dramatic operas such as Peter Grimes and Billy Budd reflected a different sort of ordinariness, his genius driving the formation of the English Opera Group at Aldeburgh. English opera, and opera in English, became central to the establishment, after the Second World War, of a national arts infrastructure, with subsidised resident companies at English National Opera and the Royal Opera. By the 1950s, due to pressure from international opera stars refusing to learn roles in English, Covent Garden joined the circuit of major international houses, staging opera in their original languages, with visiting stars such as Maria Callas, Tito Gobbi and the young Luciano Pavarotti matched by home-grown ones like Joan Sutherland and Geraint Evans.

Today British opera thrives with a reputation for fresh thinking in classics, from new productions of Mozart, Verdi and Wagner landmarks to new opera commissions and popular arena stagings of Carmen. The Arts Desk brings you the fastest overnight reviews and the quickest ticket booking links for last night's openings, as well as the most thoughtful close-up interviews with major creative figures and performers. Our critics include Igor Toronyi-Lalic, David Nice, Edward Seckerson, Alexandra Coghlan, Graham Rickson and Ismene Brown.

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