fri 28/02/2020

Opera reviews, news and interviews

Luisa Miller, English National Opera review - Verdi in translation makes a stylish comeback

David Nice

Those who booed the production team last night - there was nothing but generous cheering for singers, conductor and orchestra - might reflect that this was at least regietheater, that singular brand of not-all-bad director's opera in Germany, with discipline and purpose close enough to its subject.

theartsdesk Q&A: soprano Elizabeth Llewellyn

David Nice

Could English National Opera be about to right the wrong done to a national treasure?

 

Les vêpres siciliennes, Welsh National Opera...

Stephen Walsh

It’s not hard to see why The Sicilian Vespers has struggled since its surprisingly successful opening run at the Paris Opéra in 1855. Verdi had...

Alice's Adventures Under Ground, Royal Opera...

David Nice

"About as much fun as you can have with your clothes on," promised a member of the two Royal Opera casts teamworking their way through multiple roles...

Ermonela Jaho, Stephen Maughan, Wigmore Hall...

Sebastian Scotney

Wigmore Hall audiences don’t usually roar. But when a star soprano who has already made her mark at the world’s major opera houses pays a visit, they...

Siegfried, LPO, Jurowski, RFH review - an incandescent journey to the mountain top

David Nice

Varying degrees of vocal characterisation, but the playing is breathtakingly detailed

Street Scene, Opera North review - a true ensemble achievement

Robert Beale

Youth to the fore in Kurt Weill’s brilliant ‘Broadway opera’

Sukanya, RFH review - Ravi Shankar's bright-eyed, varied fable

David Nice

Fine performances, but crude miking suggests this would work better as a chamber opera

prisoner of the state, Barbican review - beauty, but where is the drama?

Alexandra Coghlan

David Lang's efficient homage to Beethoven can't eclipse the original

'Divinity is all around us': soprano Susanna Hurrell on Ravi Shankar's 'Sukanya'

Susanna Hurrell

Celebrating the 100th anniversary of the Indian master's birth with a return to his opera

Best of 2019: Opera

David Nice

Haunted-ballroom Shostakovich and high jinks in Royal Albert Hall Berlioz top the bill

Peter Grimes, Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra, Gardner, RFH review - more instrumental than vocal intensity

David Nice

Superlative playing and conducting, some fine singing, but the protagonist is a bit peaky

theartsdesk Q&A: Director Sir Jonathan Miller

Igor Toronyi-Lalic

The legendary director lets rip

Death in Venice, Royal Opera review – expansive but intimate evocations

Gavin Dixon

David McVicar brings light and movement to gloomy Venice, but holds psychological focus

Orphée, English National Opera review – through a screen darkly

Boyd Tonkin

Matters of life and death reflected in Glass and Cocteau's myth

Mrs Peachum's Guide to Love and Marriage, Mid Wales Opera review - scaled down seediness, with a swing

Richard Bratby

Toxic femininity takes centre stage in the outrageous essence of The Beggar's Opera

Der Freischütz, Barbican review - Gothic chills rooted in flesh and earth

Alexandra Coghlan

Two outstanding leads make for a memorable concert-staging

The Mask of Orpheus, English National Opera review - amorphous excess

David Nice

Daniel Kramer's camp carnival defuses any focus in Birtwistle's bruising score

Don Pasquale, Royal Opera review - fun and frolics in stylish new production

Miranda Heggie

Bryn Terfel shines but Olga Peretyatko soars in Donizetti's charming comedy

The Cunning Little Vixen, Welsh National Opera review - family night in the forest

Stephen Walsh

Janáček’s life cycle comes up fresh and inspiring after four decades

Orpheus in the Underworld, English National Opera review – ENO goes to hell

Jessica Duchen

Offenbach's sparkling operetta is well sung, but this production is dead on arrival

The Silver Lake, English Touring Opera review - shadows of the Weimar twilight

Boyd Tonkin

A welcome resurrection of Kurt Weill's sombre farewell to Germany

The Seraglio, English Touring Opera review – focused and light

Gavin Dixon

Small-scale, traditional staging allows Mozart’s early comedy to shine

Orpheus and Eurydice, English National Opera review – imaginative but underwhelming

Gavin Dixon

Dance focus intrigues, but is let down by incoherent designs and modest musical offerings

Jessye Norman, 1945-2019

David Nice

The great soprano has died at the age of 74, leaving behind a fabulous legacy

Rigoletto, Welsh National Opera review - same old update, fine performance

Stephen Walsh

Verdi in the White House but sung and played as if born in Wales

The Intelligence Park, Linbury Theatre review - baroque to the point of obscurity

David Nice

Nearly 30 years on from its premiere, this oddity shows its style, but still not much more

Agrippina, Royal Opera review - carry on up the Campidoglio

David Nice

Vamping, stamping and men-babies on stage, a capricious beast in the pit

Carmen, Welsh National Opera review - intermittent brilliance in a gloomy, unclear environment

Stephen Walsh

Bizet's tragic masterpiece well sung but short on dramatic momentum

Footnote: a brief history of opera in Britain

Britain has world-class opera companies in the Royal Opera, English National Opera, Welsh National Opera, Scottish Opera and Opera North, not to mention the celebrated country-house festival at Glyndebourne and others elsewhere. The first English opera was an experiment in 1656, as Civil War raged between Cromwell and Charles II, and it was under the restored king that theatre and opera exploded in London. Henry Purcell composed the masterpiece Dido and Aeneas (for a girls' school) and over the next century Handel, Gluck, J C Bach and Haydn came to London to compose Italian-style classical operas.

Hogarth_Beggars_Opera_1731_cTateHowever, the imported style was challenged by the startling success of John Gay's low-life street opera The Beggar's Opera (1728), a score collating 69 folk ballads, which set off a wave of indigenous popular musical theatre (pictured, William Hogarth's The Beggar's Opera, 1731, © Tate). Gay built the first Covent Garden opera house (1732), where three of Handel's operas were premiered, and musical theatre and vaudeville flourished as an alternative to opera. Through the 19th century, London became a hub for visiting composers and grand opera stars, but from the meshing of "high" and "popular" creativity at Sadler's Wells (built in 1765) evolved in time a distinct English tradition of wit and social satire in the "Savoy" operas of Gilbert and Sullivan.

In the 20th century Benjamin Britten's dramatic operas such as Peter Grimes and Billy Budd reflected a different sort of ordinariness, his genius driving the formation of the English Opera Group at Aldeburgh. English opera, and opera in English, became central to the establishment, after the Second World War, of a national arts infrastructure, with subsidised resident companies at English National Opera and the Royal Opera. By the 1950s, due to pressure from international opera stars refusing to learn roles in English, Covent Garden joined the circuit of major international houses, staging opera in their original languages, with visiting stars such as Maria Callas, Tito Gobbi and the young Luciano Pavarotti matched by home-grown ones like Joan Sutherland and Geraint Evans.

Today British opera thrives with a reputation for fresh thinking in classics, from new productions of Mozart, Verdi and Wagner landmarks to new opera commissions and popular arena stagings of Carmen. The Arts Desk brings you the fastest overnight reviews and the quickest ticket booking links for last night's openings, as well as the most thoughtful close-up interviews with major creative figures and performers. Our critics include Igor Toronyi-Lalic, David Nice, Edward Seckerson, Alexandra Coghlan, Graham Rickson and Ismene Brown.

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