tue 13/04/2021

CD: The Strypes – Little Victories | reviews, news & interviews

CD: The Strypes – Little Victories

CD: The Strypes – Little Victories

Irish garage blues firebrands lose their way on album number two

Little Victories: unfocused

Bands who successfully emulate their heroes on their debut album, as The Strypes did with Snapshot, their 2013 homage to sharp-edged garage blues, sometimes find themselves wondering where to go next when the dust of critical and popular acclaim settles. Instead of the well-worn path of a timid, evolutionary change to their sound, the Strypes have decided to shake things up considerably by throwing something from all their favourite bands into Little Victories.

Bands who successfully emulate their heroes on their debut album, as The Strypes did with Snapshot, their 2013 homage to sharp-edged garage blues, sometimes find themselves wondering where to go next when the dust of critical and popular acclaim settles. Instead of the well-worn path of a timid, evolutionary change to their sound, the Strypes have decided to shake things up considerably by throwing something from all their favourite bands into Little Victories. Unfortunately this has led to the creation of an album that is unfocused at best and derivative at worst. It also suggests that the influence of Dr Feelgood and the Yardbirds has been pushed aside by plodding lad-rockers Kasabian.

To be fair, there are occasional hints of the wailing harmonica and punky rhythm and blues that have seen The Strypes become lively favourites around the clubs and festivals of the UK, especially on the raucous “Status Update” and “Best Man”. Similarly, the stomping blues-rock riffage of “Now She’s Gone” and the punk-pop of “Three Streets and Village Green” imply that the Strypes still have plenty in the tank. However, the Kasabian-lite of “I Need To Be Your Only” and “Queen Of The Half Crown” and the faux-Britpop power ballad of “(I Wanna Be Your) Everyday” suggest that a good deal more time could have been spent song-writing over the last couple of years. This is only emphasised further by “Cab Fare Home”, a tale of being out on the pull while exhibiting all the poise of someone taking pointers from the LAD Bible.

The Strypes may have picked up plenty of acclaim for their live shows in recent years but this album suggests that they need to think about where they actually want to go, because Little Victories is a bit of a mess.

The Strypes have decided to shake things up considerably by throwing something from all their favourite bands into Little Victories

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Editor Rating: 
2
Average: 2 (1 vote)

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Laziest review I've ever seen. The Kasabian influence couldn't be more wrong. It sounds like you just read a bunch of the reviews of the first album and threw some of that stuff in. Obviously they ditched the Dr. Feelgood and Yardbirds sound of the first record, which you decided to just throw in to the review of their second album for no reason other than to try and pigeon hole them. A dead good band, record, and insane live performers.

Lazy indeed! Playing a snide game of 'spot the influence' doesn't actually constitute a review.

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