sun 22/09/2019

We recommend: theartsdesk's New Music CDs of the Year | reviews, news & interviews

We recommend: theartsdesk's New Music CDs of the Year

We recommend: theartsdesk's New Music CDs of the Year

Our new music writers sift out their personal top choices from the CDs of 2011

PJ Harvey: one of the key voices of a troubled year

With more than 200 discs of the day picked by our new music writers this year, there's been no shortage of good stuff to plug into. Here our writers select their crème de la crème of 2011. Or you can browse back through the whole year's selection.

PJ Harvey - Let England Shake *****

Mara Carlyle - Floreat *****

  • Joe Muggs's choice: "This album veritably glides out of the speakers, full of light, air, easy wit and endless hooks... yet the emotional weight and musical depths hidden behind its inviting surfaces are devastating." theartsdesk's original review

Bon Iver - Bon Iver *****

  • Mark Kidel's choice: "The second CD by Justin Vernon, aka Bon Iver, is one of those earworm-laden offerings that leave you wanting for more and haunted by seductive phrases and catchy tunes." theartsdesk's original review

Laura Marling - A Creature I Don't Know *****

  • Graeme Thomson's choice: "Marling’s third album feels like a more wayward, somewhat wanton older sister to her first two records. It pulls at the hems of her music, musses its hair, smudges its lipstick. Though her ingrained Englishness will never disappear, now... the songs are looser, the rhythms more adventurous." theartsdesk's original review

Elbow – Build a Rocket Boys! *****

  • Bruce Dessau's choice: "While other releases have had an instant impact there is an almost unfathomable depth to the work of Guy Garvey and co. Repeat listens have paid much bigger dividends than my bank account." theartsdesk's original review

Motörhead - The World is Yours *****

  • Thomas H Green's choice: "Their driven grit, their earthed ire, rather than media-friendly irony and i-Phone sleekness, are just what the doctor ordered."

Metronomy - The English Riviera *****

  • Russ Coffey's choice: "The English Riviera has been working a campaign of subtle seduction on you. It's not in your face. It doesn't chat you up or ask you to buy it drinks. It just sits there being pretty and unassuming, and before you know it, you're a little bit in love with it." theartsdesk's original review

Lykke Li - Wounded Rhymes *****

  • Kieron Tyler's choice: "This is the one that keeps being returned to. Lykke Li’s Wounded Rhymes kept forcing its way to the top of the pile, insisting it had to be heard." theartsdesk's original review

 Rustie - Glass Swords *****

  • Joe Muggs' choice: "If 2011 was the year when dance music's natural tendency to fragmentation was taken to extremes, this album was the one that bound those fragments together into one demented but scintillating vision." Rustie review on theartsdesk

Danger Mouse and Daniele Luppi - Rome *****

  • Peter Culshaw's choice: "The widescreen orchestral luxuriance and sheer craft of Rome made it one of the most accomplished and darkly romantic pop artefacts of the year." theartsdesk's original review

Share this article

Comments

Anything from Peter Quinn?

Add comment

Subscribe to theartsdesk.com

Thank you for continuing to read our work on theartsdesk.com. For unlimited access to every article in its entirety, including our archive of more than 10,000 pieces, we're asking for £3.95 per month or £30 per year. We feel it's a very good deal, and hope you do too.

To take an annual subscription now simply click here.

And if you're looking for that extra gift for a friend or family member, why not treat them to a theartsdesk.com gift subscription?

newsletter

Get a weekly digest of our critical highlights in your inbox each Thursday!

Simply enter your email address in the box below

View previous newsletters

Advertising feature

★★★★★

A compulsive, involving, emotionally stirring evening – theatre’s answer to a page-turner.
The Observer, Kate Kellaway

 

Direct from a sold-out season at Kiln Theatre the five star, hit play, The Son, is now playing at the Duke of York’s Theatre for a strictly limited season.

 

★★★★★

This final part of Florian Zeller’s trilogy is the most powerful of all.
The Times, Ann Treneman

 

Written by the internationally acclaimed Florian Zeller (The Father, The Mother), lauded by The Guardian as ‘the most exciting playwright of our time’, The Son is directed by the award-winning Michael Longhurst.

 

Book by 30 September and get tickets from £15*
with no booking fee.