sun 26/05/2024

BeauSoleil, Queen Elizabeth Hall | reviews, news & interviews

BeauSoleil, Queen Elizabeth Hall

BeauSoleil, Queen Elizabeth Hall

Cajun kings are joined on stage by Meltdown curator Richard Thompson

Custodians of Cajun culture: BeauSoleil
Our story begins in the early 1970s, when a young fiddler from Louisiana named Michael Doucet was making rock music. Then one day he heard a song by Fairport Convention: “Cajun Woman” (from the band’s Unhalfbricking album). He was shocked and delighted that an English group should be taking an interest in a strand of music that seemed to be fading into obscurity. In a sort of Proustian moment, he inhaled the fragrance of “Cajun Woman”, his interest in the music of his native region was awakened, and Doucet began to immerse himself in the folk music of France and of his home state, where French music and culture have survived ever since the influx in the mid-18th century of Arcadian settlers (Cadiens; hence Cajun) from Nova Scotia.
Our story begins in the early 1970s, when a young fiddler from Louisiana named Michael Doucet was making rock music. Then one day he heard a song by Fairport Convention: “Cajun Woman” (from the band’s Unhalfbricking album). He was shocked and delighted that an English group should be taking an interest in a strand of music that seemed to be fading into obscurity. In a sort of Proustian moment, he inhaled the fragrance of “Cajun Woman”, his interest in the music of his native region was awakened, and Doucet began to immerse himself in the folk music of France and of his home state, where French music and culture have survived ever since the influx in the mid-18th century of Arcadian settlers (Cadiens; hence Cajun) from Nova Scotia.

Comments

Good review, although I would tactfully add that I'm glad you enjoyed it more than me! Despite the implication of the introduction, Richard actually played his 'Woman or a Man?, not 'Cajun Woman'. Chris

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