thu 24/09/2020

Yevgeny Sudbin, Wigmore Hall | reviews, news & interviews

Yevgeny Sudbin, Wigmore Hall

Yevgeny Sudbin, Wigmore Hall

Younger-generation Russian pianist shines a brilliant light on the rich and rare

Yevgeny Sudbin: shining a brilliant light on complex worksClive Barda

Older pianomanes may lament the passing of the great Russian schooling that gave us the likes of Sofronitsky, Yudina and Richter. I'm not so sure. The younger generations may have dropped the mystic torch, but their more even-tempered approach can beguile. Yevgeny Sudbin forms the current holy trinity with Boris Berezovsky and Nikolai Lugansky. His latest Wigmore recital was revelatory, not always in a good way; that broad beam needn't have swept every corner of the broad Russian church he so singularly constructed in the programme's second half. But anyone who can make Liszt sound as lucid as Haydn is unique.

Older pianomanes may lament the passing of the great Russian schooling that gave us the likes of Sofronitsky, Yudina and Richter. I'm not so sure. The younger generations may have dropped the mystic torch, but their more even-tempered approach can beguile. Yevgeny Sudbin forms the current holy trinity with Boris Berezovsky and Nikolai Lugansky. His latest Wigmore recital was revelatory, not always in a good way; that broad beam needn't have swept every corner of the broad Russian church he so singularly constructed in the programme's second half. But anyone who can make Liszt sound as lucid as Haydn is unique.

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Comments

Actually it was Hob.XVI:32, not 29.

Corrected, thanks, AA: no idea where that not so magic number came from.

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