sat 15/12/2018

Film Interviews

Laurent Cantet: 'Young people have different preoccupations nowadays' – interview

Demetrios Matheou

Like Ken Loach and the Dardennes brothers, Laurent Cantet is a filmmaker with a keen interest in social issues and themes, often using non-professional actors and a naturalistic approach, but perfectly willing to inject a...

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Erik Poppe and Andrea Berntzen: 'When white young men do stuff like this, we just shake our heads'

Owen Richards

On 22nd July 2011, on a tiny island off the Norwegian coast, 69 young people were killed, with another 109 injured in a terrorist attack. It was the darkest day in Norway since World War Two, and one that is still evident in its news, politics and society today.

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Matthew Holness: 'I wanted to make a modern silent horror film'

Owen Richards

Watching Matthew Holnessdebut feature Possum, you’d be forgiven in thinking he was a tortured soul.

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Agnès Varda: 'You think I'm finished?!' - interview

Demetrios Matheou

At a time when the issue over the scarcity of opportunities for female filmmakers is finally winning traction, it’s important not to forget those women who have succeeded, despite the obstacles. One of these, and one of the very first to make a singular impression, is Agnès Varda. 

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Michel Hazanavicius: 'Losing himself is how he found himself'

Demetrios Matheou

French director Michel Hazanavicius made a name for himself with his OSS 117 spy spoofs, Nest of Spies (2006) and Lost in Rio (2009), set in the Fifties and Sixties respectively and starring Jean Dujardin as a somewhat idiotic and prejudiced secret agent.

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Andrew Haigh: 'In the end you have to be able to make the decisions' - interview

Adam Sweeting

Very early in his career, Andrew Haigh worked as an assistant editor on such Ridley Scott blockbusters as Gladiator and Black Hawk Down. He didn't actually meet Scott in person until years later, when the eminent director had no recollection of him.

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Juliette Binoche: ‘Repetition feels like near death’

Demetrios Matheou

It’s about time Juliette Binoche and Claire Denis teamed up: the legendary French actress, Gallic film royalty known by her countrymen and women as La Binoche, with one of the country’s most unique directors, both talented and formidable women who have very much forged their own paths in the...

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Milos Forman: 'The less you know about yourself, the happier you are'

Jasper Rees

The second thing I noticed about Miloš Forman, who has died at the age of 86, was the spectacular imperfection of his English.

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Clio Barnard: 'We need to talk about sexual abuse' - interview

Owen Richards

Clio Barnard has quietly been building a reputation as one of Britain’s most human storytellers.

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Daniel Day-Lewis: 'I'm quite good at mending things'

Jasper Rees

Daniel Day-Lewis doesn’t look like a 60-year-old retiree. He’s wearing a striped T-shirt under a dark blue shirt, light brown trousers which descend no further than mid-calf and boots laced high above the ankle he could easily have worn as a young actor in My Beautiful Laundrette. Ditto the earring. He remains as thin and sleek as a whippet.

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Jeremy Irons: 'I was never very beautiful' - interview

Jasper Rees

In 2016 the Bristol Old Vic turned 250. To blow out the candles, England’s oldest continually running theatre summoned home one of its most splendid alumni.

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'It was appealing to make a thriller about mental illness': Gareth Tunley and Alice Lowe on 'The Ghoul'

Thomas Barrie

Gareth Tunley, director of the psychological drama The Ghoul, and Alice Lowe, one of its stars, are a duo with eclectic tastes. They share a background in comedy, but cite everything from punk to surrealism and the occult as influences on Tunley’s directorial debut, which was produced by Ben Wheatley.

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Olivia Williams interview: 'Are you on drugs?' 'No I've just spent the day acting'

Jasper Rees

Olivia Williams’s first film was, (in)famously, seen by almost no one. The Postman, Kevin Costner’s expensive futuristic misfire, may have summoned her from the depths of chronic unemployment, but the first time anyone actually clapped eyes on her was in Wes Anderson’s Rushmore, in which Bill Murray most understandably falls in love with her peachy reserved English rose. Then came The Sixth Sense, in which with great subtlety she in effect gave two performances as...

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10 Questions for Adeel Akhtar: 'The first form of defiance is to laugh'

Jasper Rees

Earlier this year Adeel Akhtar won the BAFTA for best actor. In Murdered By My Father, he gave a heartbreaking performance as the widowed father of a daughter who goes against his desire to arrange an advantageous marriage for her. In a nuanced domestic tragedy, he revealed fresh depths of agony, fear and rage that will have surprised those who mainly knew him as Faisal, the dimwitted terrorist in...

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10 Questions for film director Roger Donaldson – 'motor racing in the 1960s was incredibly dangerous'

Adam Sweeting

An Australian who emigrated to New Zealand in 1965, Roger Donaldson cut his teeth in documentaries and TV before launching into a career in feature films. His first feature, Sleeping Dogs (1976), on the unlikely theme of a New Zealand plunged into totalitarianism, immediately attracted attention, and after he made Smash Palace (1982) Hollywood came calling.

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Charlotte Rampling: 'I had to survive!' - interview

Liz Thomson

The seizième arrondissement, the Paris equivalent of Kensington and Chelsea, or Manhattan’s Upper East Side. Haussmann’s Paris par excellence. Here, in a gated complex where American heiress Florence Gould hosted lavish wartime salons, indulging in conduct which, come the liberation, she was required to explain, lives Charlotte Rampling. The marble foyer is vast, the lift small and cranky, like something out of a movie.

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