mon 03/08/2020

Film Reviews

Proxima review - family frays before lift-off

Nick Hasted

This sober French space movie is concerned with what a female astronaut leaves behind on Earth, not what she finds in the cosmic dark. Sarah (Eva Green) has been selected for a European Space Agency mission towards Mars, realising a childhood dream.

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Make Up review – coming of age in creepy Cornwall

Graham Fuller

Minutes into Make Up, Claire Oakley’s auspicious first feature as writer-director, unearthly sounds welcome unwitting Ruth (Molly Windsor) to her intimidating baptismal adventure as an 18-year-old who's not so much bi-curious as bi-phobic. A nail-biter to begin with, she’s soon hearing and seeing portents of horror everywhere, not least on the tips of her fingers.

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Unhinged review - road-rage Russ goes gonzo

Adam Sweeting

It may be one of the first movies to be shown in cinemas post-lockdown, but Unhinged is a pale ghost of some much better movies.

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Infamous review - Bonnie and Clyde for the digital age fails to deliver

Joseph Walsh

Like a sub-par Natural Born Killers for Gen Z, director-screenwriter Joshua Caldwell’s latest film, featuring Disney-child-star-turned-porn-director Bella Thorne, tackles the perils of social media like a parent trying to navigate TikTok. 

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Coincoin and the Extra-Humans review – God's gunk

Graham Fuller

It’s no accident that the eponymous young antihero of Coincoin and the Extra-Humans loses his virginity to the daughter of a French white nationalist in a field close to a sewage farm.

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Saint Frances review - relatable and honest

Markie Robson-Scott

“I’m for sure getting rid of it,” 34-year-old Bridget (cool, understated Kelly O’Sullivan, who also wrote the script; she was creatively inspired by Greta Gerwig's Lady Bird) tells her younger, casual boyfriend Jace (an endearing Max Lipchitz) when she finds out she’s pregnant.

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How to Build a Girl review - riotous fun

Owen Richards

Ever felt like you could express yourself more freely, if only you could get away from everything that made you who are?

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Piranhas review - riding with the teenage gangs of Naples

Adam Sweeting

Roberto Saviano’s book Gomorrah shone a blinding light on the Camorra crime clans of Naples, and spun off an acclaimed film and equally admired TV series.

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Come As You Are review - a road trip with a difference

Owen Richards

At a point in the early noughties, every third film was a teen comedy about a road trip to lose one's virginity. It’s a genre most were glad to see the back of. What a pleasant surprise Come As You Are is then, which brings much needed heart and relevancy to this tired trope.

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Good Manners review - compellingly eerie

Matt Wolf

Stylish, eerie and unexpectedly moving by the time of its apocalyptic finish, the strangely titled Good Manners makes for a genuine celluloid surprise.

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Clemency review - devastating death row drama

Joseph Walsh

“All we want is to be seen and heard,” explains a lawyer to a death row inmate, paraphrasing a line from Ralph Ellison’s novel Invisible Man, from which Chinonye Chukwu’s new film Clemency takes inspiration.

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DVD/Blu-ray: Moffie

India Lewis

Characterised by jarring juxtapositions of intense, appalling violence and the serene beauty of South AfricaOliver Hermanus’ fourth feature is the story of a young man coming to terms with his sexuality against the background of apartheid and prejudice.

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Love Sarah review - missing key ingredients

Matt Wolf

The cakes look great, but it's back to the recipe books in almost every other way for Love Sarah, a subpar film from director Eliza Schroeder about the struggles of a west London patisserie in the age of Brexit.

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Scoob! review - mostly bark, little bite

Owen Richards

Scooby fans have waited over 50 years for a proper big screen adaptation of everyone’s favourite cowardly dog (sorry Cartoon Network’s Courage).

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Finding The Way Back review - alcoholism on the rebound

Joseph Walsh

Gavin O’Connor has made a career out of sturdy films that make grown men cry. His best was Warrior - a hulking, tear-jerking tale of male fragility and addiction. His latest Finding The Way Back is a potent, raw drama that explores similar terrain and reunites him with Ben Affleck (they last worked together on The Accountant).

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Litigante review - an unflashy film which rings true

Adam Sweeting

Colombian director Franco Lolli’s debut feature Gente de Bien (2014) was a hit at several international film festivals, and Litigante should burnish his reputation further.

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