sat 19/09/2020

Film Reviews

Coincoin and the Extra-Humans review – God's gunk

Graham Fuller

It’s no accident that the eponymous young antihero of Coincoin and the Extra-Humans loses his virginity to the daughter of a French white nationalist in a field close to a sewage farm.

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Saint Frances review - relatable and honest

Markie Robson-Scott

“I’m for sure getting rid of it,” 34-year-old Bridget (cool, understated Kelly O’Sullivan, who also wrote the script; she was creatively inspired by Greta Gerwig's Lady Bird) tells her younger, casual boyfriend Jace (an endearing Max Lipchitz) when she finds out she’s pregnant.

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How to Build a Girl review - riotous fun

Owen Richards

Ever felt like you could express yourself more freely, if only you could get away from everything that made you who are?

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Piranhas review - riding with the teenage gangs of Naples

Adam Sweeting

Roberto Saviano’s book Gomorrah shone a blinding light on the Camorra crime clans of Naples, and spun off an acclaimed film and equally admired TV series.

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Come As You Are review - a road trip with a difference

Owen Richards

At a point in the early noughties, every third film was a teen comedy about a road trip to lose one's virginity. It’s a genre most were glad to see the back of. What a pleasant surprise Come As You Are is then, which brings much needed heart and relevancy to this tired trope.

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Good Manners review - compellingly eerie

Matt Wolf

Stylish, eerie and unexpectedly moving by the time of its apocalyptic finish, the strangely titled Good Manners makes for a genuine celluloid surprise.

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Clemency review - devastating death row drama

Joseph Walsh

“All we want is to be seen and heard,” explains a lawyer to a death row inmate, paraphrasing a line from Ralph Ellison’s novel Invisible Man, from which Chinonye Chukwu’s new film Clemency takes inspiration.

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DVD/Blu-ray: Moffie

India Lewis

Characterised by jarring juxtapositions of intense, appalling violence and the serene beauty of South AfricaOliver Hermanus’ fourth feature is the story of a young man coming to terms with his sexuality against the background of apartheid and prejudice.

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Love Sarah review - missing key ingredients

Matt Wolf

The cakes look great, but it's back to the recipe books in almost every other way for Love Sarah, a subpar film from director Eliza Schroeder about the struggles of a west London patisserie in the age of Brexit.

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Scoob! review - mostly bark, little bite

Owen Richards

Scooby fans have waited over 50 years for a proper big screen adaptation of everyone’s favourite cowardly dog (sorry Cartoon Network’s Courage).

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Finding The Way Back review - alcoholism on the rebound

Joseph Walsh

Gavin O’Connor has made a career out of sturdy films that make grown men cry. His best was Warrior - a hulking, tear-jerking tale of male fragility and addiction. His latest Finding The Way Back is a potent, raw drama that explores similar terrain and reunites him with Ben Affleck (they last worked together on The Accountant).

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Litigante review - an unflashy film which rings true

Adam Sweeting

Colombian director Franco Lolli’s debut feature Gente de Bien (2014) was a hit at several international film festivals, and Litigante should burnish his reputation further.

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The Old Guard review - serious silliness

Jill Chuah Masters

It’s hard to take The Old Guard seriously — it’s an action film about thousand-year-old immortal warriors. Pulpy flashbacks and fake blood abounds. But The Old Guard doesn’t need to be serious or even memorable: it’s a fun, feel-good film, a rare commodity these days.

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Homemade review - laughs, loss and madness in lockdown

Demetrios Matheou

If COVID-19 isn’t the only topic being tackled by creative folk at the moment, it certainly feels like it. That’s perfectly understandable, when the practical and emotional conditions of doing anything at the moment – in lockdown – invariably become, in some way, the subject.

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Back Roads review - nice cheekbones, not much else

Matt Wolf

Back Roads has languished largely unseen since its completion in 2017, and one can see why: lurid to the point of absurdity, this adaptation of a 1999 novel by co-screenwriter Tawni O’Dell is preposterously self-serious and doesn’t augur well for a hyphenate career for leading man Alex Pettyfer, the English actor (of Magic Mike fame) here doubling for the first time as director.

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Family Romance, LLC review - the chameleon blues

Nick Hasted

Werner Herzog’s appearance in The Mandalorian paid for this deadpan, documentary-like slice of extreme Japanese life, suggesting how the director’s amusingly doomy Teutonic persona...

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