thu 08/12/2022

Graham Fuller

Graham Fuller's picture
Bio
Graham is a British writer and editor based in New York since 1986. He was the executive editor at Interview magazine (1990-2000) and the Sunday arts editor at the New York Daily News (2000-2005). He has written on film for the New York Times, New York Observer, all the British broadsheets, Sight and Sound, Film Comment and Rolling Stone.

Articles By Graham Fuller

latest in today

Album: Neil Diamond - A Neil Diamond Christmas

Oy vey. Where to start. This is essentially painful – and I write that knowing that Neil Diamond is a genuinely nice guy and that he is now...

George & Tammy, Paramount+ review - alcohol, violence an...

Some may consider country music to be corny, sentimental...

Hex, National Theatre review - 12 months after being sent to...

Hovering way, way above us, three aptly named high fairies, in voluminous chiffon, open a show that may not be airy in the metaphorical...

Ruination, Linbury Theatre review - Medea gets a makeover

At a time when every other theatre is offering an alternative Christmas show, what to make of the Royal Opera House’s first collaboration with...

Album: Backstreet Boys - A Very Backstreet Christmas

Good things don’t tend to come in slews. Slews seem to be reserved, pretty much exclusively, for the bad stuff: legal issues, school shootings,...

Orlando, Garrick Theatre review - Emma Corrin is incandescen...

Identity is thorny business. This was the parting thought of Anna X, the play that marked Emma Corrin’s West End debut in the summer of...

Blu-ray: The Cat and the Canary (1939) / The Ghost Breakers...

Paramount added a late “old dark house” mystery comedy to Hollywood’s annus mirabilis of 1939 by teaming Bob Hope with...

Mahler’s Ninth Symphony, LPO, Jurowski, RFH review - a perfo...

This greatest of symphonies starts with what’s plausibly described as arrhythmia of the heart, so it shouldn’t have been surprising to find my own...

Three Minutes: A Lengthening review - superb portrait of a v...

We hear the projector whirr as the mute 16mm film flows through the sprockets and on to the screen. For three minutes and a little longer we watch...