tue 15/10/2019

Comedy Reviews

Elf Lyons, Komedia, Brighton review - bonkers, brilliant and a bit of bare bum

Katie Colombus

Elf Lyons’ new show, Love Songs To Guinea Pigs, has moved away from her usual slapstick and absurdist mimicry into new realms of traditional stand up. She cites the reason as being unable to do mime on the radio, but there’s a more serious reason for the switch.

Read more...

Rob Beckett, St David's Hall, Cardiff review - a mixed bag of observations

Owen Richards

There’s been no avoiding Rob Beckett in recent years. His high beam smile and infectious personality have made him a mainstay of comedy shows. Now he’s back on the road with what he calls the best job in the world, stand up. You can tell he means it, with a show that thrives on enthusiasm if not consistency.

Read more...

Eddie Izzard, Brighton Dome review - splendidly surreal storytelling

Veronica Lee

Eddie Izzard is dressed in a killer outfit of black leather jacket, tartan mini-kilt, thigh-length stiletto boots – and false boobs. “I got them at IKEA,” he deadpans. He’s in jovial form for Wunderbar, his farewell tour before he hopes to enter politics.

Read more...

Russell Howard, Cardiff Motorpoint Arena review - a return with bite

Owen Richards

It’s been two years since Russell Howard last performed stand-up. That’s a long gap for such an established fixture of British comedy. As he points out, the world has changed, something reflected in his new show Respite. There are still the whimsical anecdotes that made him a star, but he now has bigger foils than his own family.

Read more...

Ed Byrne, Berry Theatre, Hedge End review - musing on middle-age angst

Veronica Lee

Ed Byrne's new show takes a philosophical bent as he muses on middle age and fatherhood. But don't worry, he's not getting soft at the age of 47 – he's as sarcastic, caustic and self-deprecating as ever in If I'm Honest...

Read more...

Count Arthur Strong, Leeds City Varieties review - stargazing and mangled syntax

Veronica Lee

Count Arthur Strong, the character created by Steve Delaney, started life in the late 1990s and  became a cult figure at the Edinburgh Fringe over several years. Radio shows and three series of a television sitcom (written with Graham Linehan) followed and now he’s taking the character back on the road with Is There Anybody Out There?

Read more...

Brydon, Mack and Mitchell, Portsmouth Guildhall review - family-friendly fun

Veronica Lee

Rob Brydon, Lee Mack and David Mitchell are the host and team captains respectively of Would I Lie to You?, the long-running BBC One panel game. Now they are touring together in Town to Town, which is family-friendly fun (with occasional naughtiness from the delightfully sweary Mack).

Read more...

Romesh Ranganathan, Brighton Dome review - transgressive, edgy and very likeable

Thomas H Green

One question springs immediately to mind on hearing that Romesh Ranganathan’s new stand-up show, The Cynic’s Mixtape, is touring: how does he find the time? Ranganathan has overtaken Jack Whitehall as Britain’s most media ubiquitous comic, with a deluge of TV shows and appearances, a column in the Guardian newspaper and even a recent autobiography.

Read more...

Sofie Hagen, Soho Theatre review - sex weekend in Swansea, anyone?

Veronica Lee

Memory is a funny thing: it can get you through exams; it can comfort you or distress you; it can last a lifetime or go in an instant. In Sofie Hagen's case, her idiosyncratic one has provided material for her new show Bumswing, which started life at the Edinburgh Fringe and is now at Soho Theatre.

Read more...

Edinburgh Fringe 2019 reviews: Jordan Brookes/ Catherine Cohen

Veronica Lee

Jordan Brookes Pleasance Courtyard ★★★★

Jordan Brookes doesn’t tell gags. Well, he does but not in a traditional stand-up way. Rather, his jokes are subtly inserted into I’ve Got Nothing’s seemingly disjointed narrative.

Read more...

Pages

Subscribe to theartsdesk.com

Thank you for continuing to read our work on theartsdesk.com. For unlimited access to every article in its entirety, including our archive of more than 10,000 pieces, we're asking for £3.95 per month or £30 per year. We feel it's a very good deal, and hope you do too.

To take an annual subscription now simply click here.

And if you're looking for that extra gift for a friend or family member, why not treat them to a theartsdesk.com gift subscription?

latest in today

A History of Water in the Middle East, Royal Court review -...

Sabrina Mahfouz is a British-Egyptian writer who has explored issues of Muslim and British identity in various formats. Her work includes poetry,...

LFF 2019: The Irishman review - masterful, unsentimental gan...

Time passes slowly and remorselessly in The Irishman. Though its much remarked de-ageing technology...

Verdi Requiem, LPO, Gardner, RFH review – beyond the big noi...

You seldom expect to feel the breath of apocalypse and the terror of the grave amid the modestly rationalist architecture and passion-killer...

CD: James Arthur - You

It’s an easy joke to suggest that James Arthur needs an editor. By this point, the 31-year-old singer is almost as...

Thomas J Campanella: Brooklyn - The Once and Future City rev...

For visitors to New York, it’s all about Manhattan, its 23...

Great Women Artists review - the book we have been waiting f...

Every now and then a book comes out that can change lives. If a survey like this had appeared when I was a student at the Slade, the struggle to...

Reissue CDs Weekly: Dip - Ḣ-Camp Meets Lo-Fi

The temptation with the 20th anniversary reissue of Ḣ-Camp Meets Lo-Fi (Explosion Picture Score) is to look for traces...

Baby Reindeer, Bush Theatre review - break, break, breaking...

True stories, even in a fictional form, have the power to grip you by the throat, furiously shake your body and then give you a parting kick in...

PP Arnold, Islington Assembly Hall review - joy in a consumm...

“I had my first inter-racial relationship.” Moments after walking on stage and before the first song, PP Arnold is reminiscing about when she...