mon 18/02/2019

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Adam Sweeting
Monday, 18 February 2019
It’s 1945 and World War Two is nearly over. Somewhere in England, Fiona Symonds (“Feef” to her friends) is training to be a spy and be dropped behind enemy lines. Her training...
David Nice
Monday, 18 February 2019
It seems an almost indecent luxury to have heard two top mezzos in just over a week with so much to express, backed up by the perfect technique and instrument with which to do so...
Matt Wolf
Monday, 18 February 2019
A musicals-intensive season gets off to a wan start with 9 to 5, a retooled version of a 2009 Broadway flop based on the beloved 1980 film that proffered a sisterhood for the ages...
Katherine Waters
Monday, 18 February 2019
Ellida (Pia Tjelta) has a choice to make, the outcome of which will bind her future to her past or her present, each represented by a man. On the one hand, there is the...
David Nice
Monday, 18 February 2019
British concert audiences now know and love one great Lithuanian, among the most communicative and individual conductors in the world today (note I don't even need to prefix "...
Saskia Baron
Monday, 18 February 2019
Is there an algorithm for writing this review? There seems to have been one used to create Baptiste, a spin-off from The Missing, and even the staunchest fans...
Owen Richards
Monday, 18 February 2019
Compared to Scotland, Welsh independence has yet to hit the mainstream. The idea has been mostly supported by the Welsh-...
Guy Oddy
Monday, 18 February 2019
Beth Jeans Horton’s world seems to have been characterised by an over-supply of half-empty, small glasses of late –...
Marina Vaizey
Sunday, 17 February 2019
This is an astonishing book: in its breadth, depth and detail and also in its almost palpable, and sometimes unpalatable,...
Graham Rickson
Sunday, 17 February 2019
Stravinsky acknowledged that his orchestra for The Rite of Spring was a large one because Diaghilev had promised him extra...
Markie Robson-Scott
Sunday, 17 February 2019
A Tana French crime novel is never just a thriller. Probably more acclaimed in the USA than the UK (she gets rave reviews in...
Kieron Tyler
Sunday, 17 February 2019
Full marks for shoehorning-in the names of city’s two major football teams into the title of Manchester - A City United In...
Jasper Rees
Saturday, 16 February 2019
There is nothing quite like the Iffland-Ring in this country. The property of the Austrian state, for two centuries it has...
Matt Wolf
Saturday, 16 February 2019
The Sunday Times war correspondent Marie Colvin lived such a fearless life that it's a shame this celluloid biopic isn't...
Bernard Hughes
Saturday, 16 February 2019
The Venezuelan pianist and composer Gabriela Montero is an outspoken advocate for political change in her country, using her...
Mark Kidel
Saturday, 16 February 2019
Abdellatif Kechiche, the Tunisian-French director, is perhaps best known for the lengthy and explicit sex scenes in La vie d...
Stephen Walsh
Saturday, 16 February 2019
I last saw this Magic Flute, directed by Dominic Cooke, when it was new, some 14 years ago, and I remember it mainly, I’m...
Graham Rickson
Saturday, 16 February 2019
 Mahler: Symphony No 6 Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra/Sir Simon Rattle (Berliner Philharmoniker Recordings)This lavish...
Katie Colombus
Saturday, 16 February 2019
Avril Lavigne was the original Punk Pop Queen. Fearless, feisty and perfectly fitting for the early noughties as the...
 

CLASSICAL CDS WEEKLY Rattle's Mahler, Saint-Saëns from Utah and a capella singing from Denmark

★★ AVRIL LAVIGNE - HEAD ABOVE WATER One strong song, but elsewhere her sound doesn't seem to have evolved

REISSUE CDS WEEKLY: MANCHESTER - A CITY UNITED IN MUSIC Thought-provoking compendium dedicated to the northern musical powerhouse

★★★ THE MAGIC FLUTE, WELSH NATIONAL OPERA Charming to hear, charmless to look at

★★★★ RICHARD J EVANS: ERIC HOBSBAWM - A LIFE IN HISTORY A huge, highly detailed biography of the controversial Marxist historian

★★★ A PRIVATE WAR Rosamund Pike burns with passion in well-meaning biopic

disc of the day

CD: Du Blonde - Lung Bread for Daddy

Beth Jeans Horton gets some rotten relationships out of her system

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tv

Traitors, Channel 4 review - Cold War thriller fails to reach room temperature

Battling Stalin's secret infiltration of Whitehall

Catastrophe, Channel 4, series 4 finale review - sitcom saves the best till last

Sharon Horgan and Rob Delaney go out on a grief-stricken, hope-filled cliffhanger

film

Q&A Special: Actor Bruno Ganz on playing Hitler

The Swiss actor, who has died aged 77, was the first to play the Führer in a lead role in German

A Private War review - Rosamund Pike burns with passion in well-meaning biopic

A risk-loving journalist is remembered via a safe-seeming film

new music

Yes is More: Charlotte Church’s Late Night Pop Dungeon, Tramshed - utterly convincing

Welsh independence gig brings positivity and power to a growing movement

CD: Du Blonde - Lung Bread for Daddy

Beth Jeans Horton gets some rotten relationships out of her system

Reissue CDs Weekly: Manchester - A City United In Music

Thought-provoking compendium dedicated to the northern musical powerhouse

classical

Elīna Garanča, Malcolm Martineau, Wigmore Hall review - towards transcendence

Perfect expression and technique in Schumann, Wagner and Mahler

Ek, CBSO, Gražinytė-Tyla, Symphony Hall, Birmingham review - epics of sea and land

Mirga pairs a Lithuanian late-romantic tone poem and familiar Grieg in an unusual context

Montero, Scottish Ensemble, Kings Place review - new music with a political edge

Imaginative programming but the message sometimes overwhelmed the music

opera

The Rite of Spring/Gianni Schicchi, Opera North review - unlikely but musically satisfying pairing

Odd-couple double bill of Stravinsky and Puccini with plenty to delight ear and eye

The Magic Flute, Welsh National Opera review - charming to hear, charmless to look at

Mozart's pantomime about Nature and Reason stuck in a box

Brighton Festival 2019 launches with Guest Director Rokia Traoré

The south-coast's arts extravaganza reveals its 2019 line-up

theatre

9 to 5 the Musical review - Dolly Parton's film returns as retooled version of a Broadway flop
More like nein to five, as beloved movie is reduced to substandard panto
The Lady from the Sea, Print Room at the Coronet review - freedom to choose?
Engrossing Anglo-Norwegian production has some strong performances
Berberian Sound Studio, Donmar Warehouse review – improves the original
This dark comedy raises disturbing questions about sound and intimacy

dance

The Rite of Spring/Gianni Schicchi, Opera North review - unlikely but musically satisfying pairing

Odd-couple double bill of Stravinsky and Puccini with plenty to delight ear and eye

Brighton Festival 2019 launches with Guest Director Rokia Traoré

The south-coast's arts extravaganza reveals its 2019 line-up

Swan Lake, English National Ballet, London Coliseum review - a solid, go-to production

Traditional stagings don't come much more satisfying than Derek Deane's for ENB

comedy

Brighton Festival 2019 launches with Guest Director Rokia Traoré

The south-coast's arts extravaganza reveals its 2019 line-up

Adam Riches Is The Guy Who..., Drink, Shop & Do review - super-suave Lothario on the prowl

Immersive show examines male-female engagement in the #MeToo era

gaming

Battlefield V review - WWII on an epic scale

The veteran series returns for another ambitious tour of duty

Red Dead Redemption 2 review - the cowboy drama makes a triumphant return

An ambitious Wild West odyssey that matches epic scale with benchmark skill

visual arts

Don McCullin, Tate Britain review - beastliness made beautiful

The darkest, most compelling exhibition you are ever likely to see

Pierre Bonnard: The Colour of Memory review, Tate Modern - plenty but empty

A major retrospective of the French post-impressionist is huge, but unilluminating

latest comments

What watch is Daniel McPherson wearing on the...

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