fri 24/05/2024

Theatre Features

First Person: actor Paul Jesson on survival, strength, and the healing potential of art

Paul Jesson

In September 2022 I had an email from my American friend Richard Nelson: "Would you like me to write you a play?" Such an offer probably comes the way of very few actors and I was bowled over by it. My astonished and grateful response was tempered with a little uncertainty.

Read more...

First Person: author-turned-actor Lydia Higman on a play that foregrounds a slice of forgotten history

Lydia Higman

I first read Anne Gunter’s story about five years ago, when I was in my first year of university at Oxford, little knowing it would over time lead to our play Gunter [seen first in Edinburgh and transferring 3-25 April to the Royal Court].

Read more...

First person: playwright Paul Grellong on keeping pace with American politics

Paul Grellong

I’m writing this in the lobby of the Menier Chocolate Factory a couple of hours before the first preview. I was last here in February for the start of rehearsals. In the time since, I’ve made a handful of, one hopes, helpful adjustments to the script. I’ll let audiences be the judge of that.

Read more...

Best of 2023: Theatre

Matt Wolf

Wait, and your wishes are answered. That seemed to be the case during the theatre year just gone, following on from 2022 when new British writing of quality seemed thin on the ground.

Read more...

First Person: playwright Tom Fowler on allowing room for 'Hope'

Tom Fowler

Recently, having just shared the rehearsal draft of my current Royal Court play Hope has a Happy Meal with two close friends, I found myself slightly offended when one of them said, "you can tell you were playing the Nintendo Switch obsessively when writing this." They then proceeded to talk about the play and its structure in video game terms.

Read more...

Leslie Phillips: 'I can be recognised by my voice alone'

Jasper Rees

Leslie Phillips would have known for half a century that at his death, which was announced yesterday, the obituaries would lead with one thing only. However much serious work he did in the theatre and on screen, he is forever handcuffed to the skirt-chaser he gave us in sundry Carry Ons and Doctor films and London bus movies.

Read more...

‘Stripping naked the process of making theatre’: Martin Crimp talks about his latest play

aleks Sierz

The fictional world is our world, but at the same time it’s another place. We want our writers to invent interesting characters, gripping plots and to take us to unexpected places. We want them to delight us, and sometimes to fright us. We want to immerse ourselves in their inventions, lose ourselves in their fictions, and explore their newly created worlds. But are writers allowed to say anything they want?

Read more...

First Person: playwright Naomi Wallace on finally hearing her work performed in English

Naomi Wallace

The Breach is a coming of age story and an age-in-the-making story. The play takes place in the U.S. in the 1970s and 1990s, switching back and forth between teenagers in Louisville and their older selves 15 years later.

Read more...

First Person: playwright Chinonyerem Odimba on birthing her potent and timely new show

Chinonyerem Odimba

People often ask how long a play takes to make its way out of you. And it’s always a valid question because no matter how beautiful, soft, joyful, or short a play is, there is a wrestling match that takes place between the idea lodging itself somewhere in you, and it turning into words that actors can have fun getting to know.

Read more...

First Person: Tim Walker on crossing over from critic to playwright

Tim Walker

The divide between theatre critics and the theatrical profession has always been a chasm, but occasionally a wire has been thrown between the two and plucky or foolhardy individuals have attempted to traverse it. A three-times-unsuccessful applicant to the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in my teens, I managed to turn actor in middle age in Top Hat and Spamalot in the West End.

Read more...

Pages

Advertising feature

★★★★★

A compulsive, involving, emotionally stirring evening – theatre’s answer to a page-turner.
The Observer, Kate Kellaway

 

Direct from a sold-out season at Kiln Theatre the five star, hit play, The Son, is now playing at the Duke of York’s Theatre for a strictly limited season.

 

★★★★★

This final part of Florian Zeller’s trilogy is the most powerful of all.
The Times, Ann Treneman

 

Written by the internationally acclaimed Florian Zeller (The Father, The Mother), lauded by The Guardian as ‘the most exciting playwright of our time’, The Son is directed by the award-winning Michael Longhurst.

 

Book by 30 September and get tickets from £15*
with no booking fee.


latest in today

Punt and Dennis, Marlowe Theatre Canterbury review - satire...

Ten years after their last tour Steve Punt and High Dennis are back on the road with We Are Not a Robot. It comes after their long-...

Furiosa: A Mad Max Saga review - just as mad without Max

In the way of Batman being overshadowed by his villains, in his last outing, Mad Max: Fury Road, the erstwhile hero of George Miller...

The Beach Boys, Disney+ review - heroes and villains and goo...

It was – let’s see – 63 years ago today that Brian Wilson taught the band to play. Fabled for their resplendent harmonies and ecstatic hymning of...

Album: Twenty One Pilots - Clancy

If there is one positive of the past decade, it must be the growing openness with...

Richard III, Shakespeare's Globe review - Michelle Terr...

There’s a fierce, dark energy to the Globe’s new Richard III that I don’t recall at that venue for a fair while. The drilled cast dances...

Kolesnikov, Wigmore Hall review - celestial navigation throu...

Like his baggy white suit, pitched somewhere between Liberace and Colonel Sanders, Pavel Kolesnikov’s playing was spotless at the...

Between Riverside and Crazy, Hampstead Theatre review - race...

It’s often said that contemporary American playwrights are too polite, too afraid of giving offence. But this accusation can’t be levelled at...

Album: Isobel Campbell - Bow to Love

Isobel Campbell has maintained a consistent career on the fringes of popular music for three decades. She's made a home in the area where...

'I think of her as a proto-punk': documentarist Sv...

Anita Pallenberg was a vital presence in the Stones’ most vital years. Her bright eyes and hungry mouth betrayed a ferocious appetite for pleasure...

Passing Strange, Young Vic review - exuberant pocket musical...

From New York’s Public Theater, the venue that nurtured Hamilton, comes another estimable pocket...