fri 18/06/2021

Theatre Reviews

After Life, National Theatre review - thanks for the memories

Helen Hawkins

Limbo, in Jack Thorne’s latest play, is a room lined ceiling-high with drawers, a sort of morgue rebooted as a vast filing system.

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The Death of a Black Man, Hampstead Theatre review - blistering theatre with an unflinching vision

Rachel Halliburton

This blistering, fearless play about an 18-year-old black entrepreneur on the King’s Road raises a myriad of uncomfortable questions that resonate profoundly with the Black Lives Matter debate.

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Four Quartets, Theatre Royal Bath review - Ralph Fiennes gives a compelling performance

Veronica Lee

For 75 captivating minutes, Ralph Fiennes digs deep into TS Eliot’s Four Quartets, the poet’s interlinked reflections on time, faith and the quest for spiritual enlightenment – in what is the first solo adaptation of Eliot’s work for the stage, a co-production between Theatre Royal Bath and the Royal & Derngate,...

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Walden, Harold Pinter Theatre review – where’s the emotion?

aleks Sierz

There’s something definitely inspiring about producer Sonia Friedman’s decision to reopen one of her prime West End venues with a season, called RE:EMERGE, of three new plays.

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A Midsummer Night's Dream, Shakespeare's Globe review - a blast of colour from our post-vaccine future

Rachel Halliburton

A little less than two years after Sean Holmes’s kick-ass Latin American carnival-style A Midsummer Night’s Dream erupted at the side of the Thames, it has returned to a very different world.

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Harm, Bush Theatre review – isolation, infatuation and intensity

aleks Sierz

After months of watching theatre on screens large, medium and tiny, I definitely feel great about going to see a live show again. Of course, it’s not the usual theatre experience, you know, the one with crowds milling around the bar, people breathing down your neck and elbowing you while you’re watching, but at least it’s three-dimensional.

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Romeo and Juliet, Creation Theatre online review - game version falls between stools

Heather Neill

There is a promising production struggling to get out of this muddled concept. Creation Theatre (here partnered with Watford Palace) is well known for innovative, site-specific pieces, one of which –The Tempest – was adapted for the screen, including interactive elements, last year.

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Being Mr Wickham, Original Theatre Company online review - an uncontroversial apologia

Laura De Lisle

It wasn’t Jane Austen’s subtlest move, naming her roguish soldier George Wickham. As countless GCSE English teachers have patiently read in generations of essays, his surname sounds a lot like "wicked" – and wicked he is...

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Money, Southwark Playhouse online review - ethical dilemmas for the Zoom generation

Rachel Halliburton

To accept or not accept a donation: that’s certainly the burning political question of the moment.

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Tarantula, Southwark Playhouse online review – spine-tingling love and trauma

aleks Sierz

I think I can safely say that polymath playwright Philip Ridley has had a good lockdown.

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★★★★★

A compulsive, involving, emotionally stirring evening – theatre’s answer to a page-turner.
The Observer, Kate Kellaway

 

Direct from a sold-out season at Kiln Theatre the five star, hit play, The Son, is now playing at the Duke of York’s Theatre for a strictly limited season.

 

★★★★★

This final part of Florian Zeller’s trilogy is the most powerful of all.
The Times, Ann Treneman

 

Written by the internationally acclaimed Florian Zeller (The Father, The Mother), lauded by The Guardian as ‘the most exciting playwright of our time’, The Son is directed by the award-winning Michael Longhurst.

 

Book by 30 September and get tickets from £15*
with no booking fee.


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