thu 21/06/2018

Theatre Reviews

Julius Caesar, BBC Four review - electrifying TV launch of all-women Shakespeare trilogy

David Nice

Who would have thought, when Phyllida Lloyd's Donmar Julius Caesar opened to justified fanfare, that two more Shakespeare masterpieces would be sustained no less powerfully within the women's-prison context over the following years?

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English, Festival of Voice, Wales Millennium Centre review – lost in language

Owen Richards

Despite the Welsh repute for singing, the Festival of Voice in Cardiff has always been more than just music.

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Notes From the Field, Royal Court review - sobering report from the frontline of race

Rachel Halliburton

Anna Deavere Smith contains multitudes. As the solo performance artist recounts the testimonies she has selected from the more than 250 people she interviewed for this portrait of inequality and the criminal justice system in America, it is as if each person she has talked to possesses her.

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The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, Donmar Warehouse review - Lia Williams makes an iconic role her own

Matt Wolf

Lia Williams can be said to have been in her prime ever since the double-whammy several decades ago when she appeared onstage in fairly quick succession in Oleanna and then the original, and unsurpassable, production of Skylight.

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Machinal, Almeida Theatre review - descending into darkness

Matt Wolf

The American playwright/journalist Sophie Treadwell's 1928 expressionist drama crops up every so often in order to allow a director to leave his or her signature upon it, so the first thing to be said about Natalie Abrahami's...

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Monogamy, Park Theatre review - Janie Dee in dark family drama

aleks Sierz

Forget about dark alleys, deserted parks and slippery slopes: the most dangerous place in the world is likely to be your family. That’s where the traps are, the minefields and the surprise betrayals. As its title suggests, Torben Betts’s new comedy is all about failing marriages and imploding families.

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Isabelle Huppert reads Marquis de Sade, Queen Elizabeth Hall review - virtue twinned with vice

Rachel Halliburton

In an era marked by virtue-signalling, it's perhaps no surprise that Isabelle Huppert  a woman who has always gone against the grain  has opted for a little vice-signalling.

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Julie, National Theatre review - vacuous and unilluminating

Matt Wolf

It seems appropriate that an onstage blender features amidst Tom Scutt's sleek, streamlined set for Julie given how many times Strindberg's 1888 play has been put through the artistic magimix.

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Sancho: An Act of Remembrance, Wilton's Music Hall review - pure entertainment

Katherine Waters

One space, one person, one story, one voice  the monologue is theatre distilled, the purest form of entertainment.

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My Name is Lucy Barton, Bridge Theatre review - Laura Linney is luminous in a flawless production

David Benedict

In Harold Pinter’s memory play Old Times, one of the women declares, “There are some things one remembers even though they may never have happened.” Elizabeth Strout’s heroine in My Name Is Lucy Barton is in the reverse position. When it comes to the difficult childhood she has long since escaped, she’s uncertain of what she can – or wants to – remember, yet she is anything but the standard issue unreliable narrator.

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