fri 18/10/2019

Theatre Reviews

[Blank], Donmar Warehouse review - strong but dispiriting

aleks Sierz

Clean Break, the theatre company that specialises in working with women in the criminal justice system, is doing a lot of celebrating. It's the 40th anniversary of this unique female organisation and already this year they have put on a variety of shows, from Chloe Moss's Sweatbox to the devised piece Inside Bitch.

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Solaris, Lyric Hammersmith review - moving and finely cerebral

Tom Birchenough

David Greig’s reimagining of Stanisław Lem’s 1961 novel has brought a masterpiece of intellectual science fiction back to its...

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A History of Water in the Middle East, Royal Court review - feminist dreams and passions

aleks Sierz

Sabrina Mahfouz is a British-Egyptian writer who has explored issues of Muslim and British identity in various formats. Her work includes poetry, fiction, anthologies and performances, as well as plays. And she's pretty prolific. Since her Dry Ice was staged at the Bush in 2011, she has written some 18 other plays, of various lengths.

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Baby Reindeer, Bush Theatre review - break, break, breaking Gadd

aleks Sierz

True stories, even in a fictional form, have the power to grip you by the throat, furiously shake your body and then give you a parting kick in the arse. This is certainly true of stand-up comedian Richard Gadd's Baby Reindeer, a blistering monologue which was first seen in Edinburgh this summer, and is now at the Bush Theatre in West London.

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Groan Ups, Vaudeville Theatre review - adding ambition and emotion to the mix

Matt Wolf

If ambition were all, Groan Ups would get an A*.

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Either, Hampstead Theatre review - funny, ingenious investigation of gender and love

Rachel Halliburton

This ingenious short work deftly investigates themes of love and identity with a breezy assurance that marks first time playwright, Ruby Thomas, out as a daring and exciting new voice.

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Assassins, Watermill Theatre, Newbury - Sondheim musical in scalding form

Matt Wolf

“Every now and then the country goes a little wrong”: so goes one of the many lyrics from the Stephen Sondheim-John Weidman musical Assassins that makes this 1990 Off Broadway musical (subsequently chosen to open Sam Mendes’ Donmar Warehouse in 1992) a piece of theatre very much for our time.

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Mephisto [A Rhapsody], Gate Theatre review - the callowness of history

Tom Birchenough

You wonder about the title of French dramatist Sam Gallet’s Mephisto [A Rhapsody], an adaptation for our days of Klaus Mann’s 1936 novel about an actor unable to resist the blandishments of fame, even if they come at the cost of losing himself.

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The Man in the White Suit, Wyndham's Theatre review - sparks but no combustion in this chemistry farce

Marianka Swain

A hit comedy about a textile scientist? It might sound unlikely, but Ealing Studios’ 1951 sci-fi satire, starring Alec Guinness, was one of the most popular films of the year in Britain.

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Shuck 'n' Jive, Soho Theatre review - a mixed bag, lots of promise

Katherine Waters

Shuck 'n' Jive is an hour-long two-hander about writing a play about being black in a white industry. The industry? Theatre. Performance. The stage.

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The Observer, Kate Kellaway

 

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The Times, Ann Treneman

 

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