tue 16/07/2024

Theatre Reviews

My Father's Fable, Bush Theatre review - hilarious and haunting family drama

aleks Sierz

Following the huge success of Benedict Lombe’s Shifters, which transfers soon to the West End, the Bush Theatre is riding high. Now this venue’s latest exploration of the Black-British experience tells a really lively and emotionally deep story about Nigerians in London.

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The Bounds, Royal Court review - soccer play scores badly

aleks Sierz

Every day this week I’m watching a football match, and now – after April’s production of Lydia Higman, Julia Grogan and Rachel Lemon’s Gunter – comes another football stage drama to tear up the turf at the Royal Court’s Theatre Upstairs.

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Kiss Me, Kate, Barbican review - an entertaining, high-octane Cole Porter revival

Helen Hawkins

Lincoln Center’s Bartlett Sher is back in town to direct the Barbican’s latest summer blockbuster, Cole Porter’s classic Kiss Me, Kate. It’s an energetic, largely intelligent production of what is at base a screwball comedy with great songs. 

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The Taming of the Shrew, Shakespeare's Globe review - riotous comedy jars with the bitter pill of the production's message

Rachel Halliburton

A recent Crime Survey for England and Wales estimated that 2.1 million people in the UK had been victims of domestic abuse in the year ending March 2023. So it makes sense that director Jude Christian has addressed this tricky, troubling Shakespeare play by amplifying the genuine trauma caused by Petruchio’s “taming” of his wife Katharina.

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Miss Julie, Park Theatre review - Strindberg's kitchen drama still packs a punch

Gary Naylor

You have to tiptoe around the edge of the set just to take your seat in the Park’s studio space for Lidless Theatre’s Miss Julie. There’s a plain wooden table, a few utensils on it, wooden chairs and a small cabinet – not much, but, we’re smack inside this 19th century country house kitchen, uncomfortably close to discomfiting passions.

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Being Mr Wickham, Jermyn Street Theatre review - the plausible, charming roué gives his version of events 30 years on

Heather Neill

It is a truth universally acknowledged that an actor tends to take a sympathetic view of the character he inhabits, however morally questionable. Adrian Lukis, who played the handsome, roguish militiaman, George Wickham, in Andrew Davies's (still delightful) 1995 adaptation of Jane Austen's most popular novel, is no exception.

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Marie Curie, Charing Cross Theatre review - like polonium, best left undiscovered

Gary Naylor

There are many women whose outstanding science was attributed to men or simply devalued to the point of obscurity, but recent interest in the likes of DNA pioneer Rosalind Franklin and NASA’s Katherine Johnson has given credit where credit is due. 

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Wedding Band, Lyric Hammersmith review - revelatory staging of a Black classic

Helen Hawkins

Alice Childress’s Wedding Band has arrived at the Lyric Hammersmith like an incendiary bomb, a weapon that casts a bright light over its target even as it ferociously burns it. 

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Accolade, Theatre Royal Windsor review - orgy-loving knight makes for topical pre-election drama

Ismene Brown

Times change, people don't. Does a knighthood sit well on a man who shags anonymous strangers in the Blue Lion out of hours?

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Lie Low, Royal Court review - short sharp sliver of pain

aleks Sierz

Faye is okay. Or, at least she says she’s okay. But is she really? And, if she really is, like really okay, why is she seeking help for her insomnia?

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Pages

Advertising feature

★★★★★

A compulsive, involving, emotionally stirring evening – theatre’s answer to a page-turner.
The Observer, Kate Kellaway

 

Direct from a sold-out season at Kiln Theatre the five star, hit play, The Son, is now playing at the Duke of York’s Theatre for a strictly limited season.

 

★★★★★

This final part of Florian Zeller’s trilogy is the most powerful of all.
The Times, Ann Treneman

 

Written by the internationally acclaimed Florian Zeller (The Father, The Mother), lauded by The Guardian as ‘the most exciting playwright of our time’, The Son is directed by the award-winning Michael Longhurst.

 

Book by 30 September and get tickets from £15*
with no booking fee.


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