wed 20/03/2019

Theatre Reviews

The Son, Kiln Theatre review - darkly tragic

aleks Sierz

Well, you have to give it to French playwright Florian Zeller — he's certainly cracked the problem of coming up with a name for each of his plays. Basically, choose a common noun and put the definite article in front of it.

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The Animals and Children Took to the Streets, Lyric Hammersmith review - enchanting graphic novel

aleks Sierz

Whenever I hear the word "cosmopolitan" I think of Europe in the 1920s: German Expressionism, Russian Constructivism, Czech eccentricity, Swiss DaDa, Italian Futurism and French Surrealism. With music from Weimar cabaret and visuals by Soviet agit-prop. Let's take an imaginary train journey from Paris to Berlin to Zurich to Prague to Milan. This is the world evoked by The Animals and Children Took to the Streets.

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Follies, National Theatre review - the Sondheim spectacular returns, better than ever

Marianka Swain

This is a golden age of London Sondheim revivals, with Marianne Elliott’s thrilling Company still playing in the West End, and Dominic Cooke’s Follies getting a hugely welcome second run at the National – both testament to a director’s transformative vision.

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Eden, Hampstead Theatre Downstairs review - thoughtful commentary on people and principles

Laura De Lisle

"It's gonna be the best golf course in the world," a man in an Aertex shirt and a bright red baseball cap is assuring us. "The best. I guarantee it." You can tell he's the kind of person who thinks talking quickly and loudly is the same thing as being right.

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Equus, Theatre Royal Stratford East review - thrilling physicality

aleks Sierz

There is no doubt that Peter Shaffer's Equus is a modern classic. But does that justify reviving this 1973 hit play in our current social circumstances? And what can it say to us today?

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Jesus Hopped the 'A' Train, Young Vic review - shards of power amidst much that is overwrought

Matt Wolf

An entirely electric leading performance from the fast-rising Ukweli Roach is the reason for being for revisiting Jesus Hopped the 'A' Train, back in London for the first major production since the late Philip Seymour Hoffman brought his acclaimed Off Broadway premiere of it to the Donmar in 2002.

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Tartuffe, National Theatre review - morality-heavy version of the comedy classic

Heather Neill

Here's a recipe for a successful National Theatre production: take a well-loved classical comedy, employ an outstanding young director and a talented writer (so much the better if they have a proven track record together) and cast gold-standard actors, including, if possible, someone with a screen presence. What could possibly go wrong?

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Shipwreck, Almeida Theatre review - Trump-inflected fantasia mixes the polemical and the poetic

Matt Wolf

Just when you think you may have heard (and seen) enough of Donald J Trump to last a lifetime, along comes Anne Washburn's ceaselessly smart and tantalising Shipwreck to focus renewed attention on the psychic fallout left by 45. How did we get here from there?

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Keith? A Comedy, Arcola Theatre review - Molière mined for Brexit-era laughs

Tim Cornwell

Breathe in the love and breathe out the bullshit. After the Arcola Theatre's founder and artistic director Mehmet Ergen read Keith?

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Bodies, Southwark Playhouse review - shaky revival misses the mark

Laura De Lisle

Bodies is the latest in Two's Company's series of what they deem "forgotten masterworks", this one making a less-than-triumphant return to the London stage after almost 40 years away. Written by James Saunders in 1977, it opened at the Orange Tree in Richmond before transferring to the Hampstead Theatre and then on to the West End.

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