tue 19/03/2019

Theatre Reviews

War Horse, National Theatre review - still touching after all these years

Tim Cornwell

War Horse at the National Theatre on Sunday’s Armistice Day centenary: there were medalled veterans and at least one priest in the rows in front, dark suits and poppies all around, and scarcely a youngster in sight.

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The Simon & Garfunkel Story, Vaudeville Theatre review - more tribute act than theatre piece

Liz Thomson

What to make of The Simon & Garfunkel Story, which began a week-long residency at London’s Vaudeville Theatre last night and which tours in the new year? A success “from Sydney to Seattle” apparently, with Elaine Paige having called it “amazing” and various regional newspapers offering superlatives.

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Dramatic Exchanges review - a brilliant slice of theatre history

marina Vaizey

Dramatic Exchanges is a dazzling array of correspondence, stretching over more than a century, between National Theatre people.

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The Hoes, Hampstead Theatre review - sex and drink and grime

aleks Sierz

Because of the #MeToo movement, and the revival of feminist protest, the theme of sisterhood now has a much stronger cultural presence than at the start of the decade.

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Don Quixote, Garrick Theatre review - riotous revival of Cervantes' much-loved chivalric tale

Heather Neill

Don Quixote and his paunchy sidekick long ago escaped the pages of Miguel de Cervantes' novel. The image of the sad-faced knight on his bony nag Rocinante with his companion Sancho Panza atop his donkey are familiar in film, opera, paintings and everything from kitchen tiles to cartoons and furnishing fabric. The knight himself foretold their afterlife, predicting that his exploits would be memorialised in paintings and sculpture.

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Romeo and Juliet, Barbican review - plenty of action but not enough words

alexandra Coghlan

It’s clear from the start – from a Prologue that quickly dissolves familiar rhythms and words into a Babel of clamour and sound.

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White Teeth, Kiln Theatre review - tuneless hymn to Kilburn High Road

aleks Sierz

You can see why artistic director Indhu Rubasingham chose to stage this version of Zadie Smith's classic White Teeth as part of the Kiln's opening season.

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Still No Idea, Royal Court review - spiky, funny, and politically pointed

Matt Wolf

To the recent spate of shows that put their own narrative-building first, we can now add Still No Idea, with the addendum that this self-penned two-hander may be the funniest and fiercest of them all to date.

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ear for eye, Royal Court review - powerful and passionate anti-racism

aleks Sierz

Two countries; two histories. Being black in the US; being black in the UK. Compare and contrast. Which is exactly what debbie tucker green’s amazingly ambitious new epic, which straddles centuries and continents, succeeds in doing.

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Honour, Park Theatre review - an assault on complacency

Rachel Halliburton

Adultery seldom looks less adult than in the form of the mild-life crisis – that much-satirised condition in which desire is eclipsed by delusion, wisdom by foolishness, and sensible coats by leather jackets.

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