mon 24/06/2019

Theatre Reviews

The Lady from the Sea, Print Room at the Coronet review - freedom to choose?

Katherine Waters

Ellida (Pia Tjelta) has a choice to make, the outcome of which will bind her future to her past or her present, each represented by a man. On the one hand, there is the tempestuous seafaring Stranger (Øystein Røger) to whom, long ago and in a fit of delirium, she pledged herself; on the other, there is her devoted and rational doctor husband Wangel (Adrian Rawlins).

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Berberian Sound Studio, Donmar Warehouse review – improves the original

Rachel Halliburton

Two men called "Massimo" face the audience, one very tall, one very, well, minimo. The tall Massimo (Tom Espiner, pictured below) sports wavy shoulder length blond hair and an exuberant pearl rosary, the minimo Massimo (Hemi Yeroham) has dark hair, a beard and glasses, and intense stare.

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The American Clock, Old Vic review - Arthur Miller's musical history lesson drags

Marianka Swain

This year’s unofficial Arthur Miller season – following The Price and ahead of All My Sons at the Old Vic and Death of a Salesman at the Young Vic – now turns to his 1980 work, The American Clock, inspired in part by Miller’s own memories of the 1929 Wall Street Crash and subsequent Great Depression.

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All About Eve, Noel Coward Theatre review - less a bumpy night than an erratically arresting one

Matt Wolf

Women spend a lot of time gazing at themselves in the mirror in the Belgian auteur director Ivo van Hove's latest stage-to-screen deconstruction, All About Eve, which is based on one of the most-beloved of all films about the theatre: the 1950 Oscar-winner of the same name.

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The Price, Wyndham's Theatre review - David Suchet stands supreme

Tom Birchenough

There’s a rather sublime equilibrium to Arthur Miller’s 1968 play between the overwhelmingly heavy weight of history and a sheer life force that somehow functions, against all odds, as its counterbalance.

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The Good Person of Szechwan, Pushkin Drama Theatre, Barbican review - slick Russian Brecht

David Nice

"In our country the capable man needs luck," belts out Shen Te, the Good Person of Szechwan in the most powerful song of Brecht's epic "parable play" of 1941.

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Blue, Chapter Arts Centre review - heartbreak in the family home

Owen Richards

What's worse than grieving? That all-consuming loss. For those that have experienced it, nothing really comes close. It starts to bug Thomas (Jordan Bernarde, main picture second right) during his visit to the Williams household. Recently bereaved himself, he senses the fragility in the air but no-one seems to give a straight answer.

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Pinter Seven, Harold Pinter Theatre review - elaborations of anxiety

Tom Birchenough

It was back to the very beginning for this final instalment of “Pinter at the Pinter”, with its pairing of A Slight Ache and The Dumb Waiter.

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Home, I'm Darling, Duke of York's Theatre review - Katherine Parkinson rules the roost

Tim Cornwell

The Fifties? They were terrible: bone-cold houses where people huddled round the fireplace for heat, empty Sundays that lasted a month, drawn-out rationing, bread you could build houses with.

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The Cherry Orchard, Pushkin Drama Theatre, Barbican review - stunning absurdist Chekhov

Rachel Halliburton

There is no doubt that this Cherry Orchard, whirled into town by Roman Abramovich from Moscow, is going to be divisive.

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