mon 14/10/2019

Classical Features

Interview: William Christie

Peter Culshaw

"It's mostly very clipped and formal, but parts of it have been getting wonderfully wilder and wilder in the last few years." William Christie, whom I’ve met several times in the last decade, is describing his famous French garden in La Vendée, which has featured in many a glossy magazine. But he could also be describing himself.

Read more...

The Night Shift, Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, QEH

Jasper Rees

Go on, admit it. You’ve done it too. Someone is talking in your vicinity and you’ve turned round to give them evils. It’s a manoeuvre I’ve been perfecting for years. The classic rebuke is in the speedy twist of the neck, a withering glance in the perpetrator’s general direction (but not, crucially, into their eyeballs: too confrontational) followed by the slow, affronted turn back to face the front. For one night only, the gesture says, you are singlehandedly ruining my life. I didn't pay...

Read more...

The Seckerson Tapes: Jamie Bernstein on Leonard Bernstein

Edward Seckerson

theartsdesk.com presents The Seckerson Tapes, a series of live and uncut audio interviews from acclaimed broadcaster Edward Seckerson. We start with Jamie Bernstein - Leonard Bernstein's eldest daughter - who has been in London launching the year-long Bernstein Project at the South Bank. Seckerson, a long-standing Bernstein devotee and disciple, sat down for a frank and open discussion about exactly who her "dad" was.

Read more...

I Found My Horn special: The Art of Dennis Brain

Jasper Rees

I Found My Horn is both an autobiography of sorts and a biography of sorts. It tells the story of those phases of my life, as a schoolboy and then again aged 40, when I happened to have a French horn in my hands. But it is also an account of the instrument's long and extremely colourful history. In the 20th century that history is inextricably connected to the name of Dennis Brain, probably the greatest soloist the instrument has ever known.

Read more...

Kurt Masur & the Leipzig Gewandhaus

Igor Toronyi-Lalic

There aren’t many composers or musicians who can say that they changed society. And by that I mean really changed it. Few have ever come close to materially or politically transforming their surroundings in any truly meaningful way. There are many who claim they have, or wish they had: Wagner or Beethoven in the 19th century, Barenboim most notably – but doubtfully – in our own. But there is only one musician who actually did: the conductor, Kurt Masur.

Read more...

Pages

Subscribe to theartsdesk.com

Thank you for continuing to read our work on theartsdesk.com. For unlimited access to every article in its entirety, including our archive of more than 10,000 pieces, we're asking for £3.95 per month or £30 per year. We feel it's a very good deal, and hope you do too.

To take an annual subscription now simply click here.

And if you're looking for that extra gift for a friend or family member, why not treat them to a theartsdesk.com gift subscription?

latest in today

CD: James Arthur - You

It’s an easy joke to suggest that James Arthur needs an editor. By this point, the 31-year-old singer is almost as...

Thomas J Campanella: Brooklyn - The Once and Future City rev...

For visitors to New York, it’s all about Manhattan, its 23...

Great Women Artists review - the book we have been waiting f...

Every now and then a book comes out that can change lives. If a survey like this had appeared when I was a student at the Slade, the struggle to...

Reissue CDs Weekly: Dip - Ḣ-Camp Meets Lo-Fi

The temptation with the 20th anniversary reissue of Ḣ-Camp Meets Lo-Fi (Explosion Picture Score) is to look for traces...

Baby Reindeer, Bush Theatre review - break, break, breaking...

True stories, even in a fictional form, have the power to grip you by the throat, furiously shake your body and then give you a parting kick in...

PP Arnold, Islington Assembly Hall review - joy in a consumm...

“I had my first inter-racial relationship.” Moments after walking on stage and before the first song, PP Arnold is reminiscing about when she...

The Cunning Little Vixen, Welsh National Opera review - fami...

Considering that Janáček’s Vixen is, among other things, an allegory of the passing and returning years, it’s appropriate that...

LFF 2019: Le Mans '66 review - Matt Damon, Christian Ba...

While recent motor racing movies have been built around superstar names like Ayrton Senna and James Hunt, the protagonists of Le Mans ’66...