fri 14/06/2024

tv

The Crown, Season 6, Netflix review - royal epic in a vain search for authenticity

Helen Hawkins

A man is taking his little dog for a late-night walk. This being the opening scene of The Crown’s final season, when the illuminated Eiffel Tower looms up at the end of his street we know exactly where we are, and exactly what the date is. 

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Brawn: The Impossible Formula 1 Story, Disney+ review - classic underdog tale of the little team that could

Adam Sweeting

When they read the roll-call of British Formula One champions, the likes of Jackie Stewart, Graham and Damon Hill and Nigel Mansell tend to grab the spotlight, but Jenson Button’s dramatic and totally unexpected win in 2009 is every bit as worthy of celebration.

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Shakespeare: Rise of a Genius, BBC Two review - the Bard's soul bared in hybrid drama-documentary

Gary Naylor

Four centuries on from the publication of the First Folio, is there anything new to be said about William Shakespeare?

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Shetland, Series 8, BBC One review - same place but a different programme

Adam Sweeting

The question they’re all asking is, can Shetland survive the loss of Douglas Henshall as DI Jimmy Perez? After all, it was Henshall’s shrewd and quietly anguished performance which gave the show much of its allure. And now there’s no Mark Bonnar either, who could always be relied on to add a soupçon of angst.

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Robbie Williams, Netflix review - tormented superstar bares his soul

Adam Sweeting

If you thought being a pop star might be fun, this four-part voyage around the tortured soul of Robbie Williams may convince you otherwise. He has sold 75 million records and historic numbers of concert tickets, scored 13 Number One albums and seven Number One singles in the UK, and has a shed full of gongs including 18 Brit Awards.

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Fellow Travellers, Paramount+ review - four-decade saga of power, politics and gay love

Adam Sweeting

Derived from the similarly-titled novel by Thomas Mallon and directed by Ron Nyswaner, Fellow Travellers tracks the course of its protagonists through several decades of 20th Century American history. It’s also an account of changing attitudes to homosexuality, and how gay culture emerged from the shadows and went mainstream.

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The Pigeon Tunnel: Stories from the Life of John le Carré, Apple TV+ review - outstanding, intriguing portrait of David Cornwell

Helen Hawkins

When the Oscar-winning documentary-maker Errol Morris sat David Cornwell down before his Interrotron camera in 2019, the first salvo of the chat came, not from the interviewer, but from his subject: “Who are you?” 

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Frasier, Paramount+ review - he's back! But should he be?

Adam Sweeting

F. Scott Fitzgerald said there were no second acts in American lives, but here’s Frasier Crane coming back for his third. Frasier first appeared on TV in the third series of Cheers in 1984. After Cheers bit the dust in 1993, Frasier was transported from Boston to Seattle and reborn in his own show, which ran until 2004 and stands as one of the most revered comedies in TV history (alongside, it must be said, Cheers).

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The Reckoning, BBC One review - Savile saga that doesn't tell the whole story

Helen Hawkins

The problem with star casting is that the viewer can’t escape what it is: a very well known face pretending to be another very well known face. 

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Boiling Point, BBC One review - chef drama that's simmering nicely

Helen Hawkins

The problem facing any chef series is that its daily dramas are essentially rooted in the same small, sweaty space. It’s like one of the reductions prepared there, all the flavours compressed into an intense spoonful of sauce.

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