fri 06/12/2019

tv

Dark Money, BBC One review - powerful idea poorly executed

Adam Sweeting

It’s a topical idea, at least. Isaac Mensah, a child actor from a working-class family in London, has been cast in a Hollywood sci-fi blockbuster, and when he returns home his family and friends are agog to find out what his amazing movie experience was like.

Read more...

Stranger Things 3, Netflix review - bigger, dumber, better

Owen Richards

It sometimes feels like an age between Stranger Things seasons. Blame Netflix. The binge-watching trend that it helped solidify means that most people consume all eight hours of content in a single weekend. It comes and goes in a flash. But don’t let that fool you into thinking it’s a disposable snack, the TV equivalent of those famous Eggo pancakes.

Read more...

Gentleman Jack, BBC One, series finale review - Anne Lister weds with pride

Jasper Rees

Not too long ago it would have been unthinkable for a BBC One Sunday-night period drama series to tell of one woman’s love for another. Whatever anyone thought of it – and not everyone bade it the hearty welcome it merited – Gentleman Jack has shifted the dial.

Read more...

Inside the Ritz Hotel, ITV review - glitz and glam, but no detail

Tom Baily

Should the Ritz catch up with modernity? This question is posed and immediately answered with another question: Does it need to? Not really, say the staff, clients and celebrity guests that populate this bubbly, formulaic and unashamed celebration of what is, rightly, a gorgeous and historic venue.

Read more...

Inside the Bank of England, BBC Two review - economical with the actualité

Adam Sweeting

The BBC is pleased with itself for having insinuated a documentary team inside the Bank of England, but was this august custodian of the nation’s finances really going to let slip any juicy revelations? The Bank’s role is too powerful and too political for its employees to be anything other than extremely tight-lipped.

Read more...

Judi Dench's Wild Borneo Adventure, ITV review - national treasure meets natural wonders

Adam Sweeting

Ecological awareness has become de rigueur for any self-respecting celebrity, and if the chances of saving the planet were in direct proportion to the number of renowned personages criss-crossing it on well-intentioned missions, we could all stop worrying. Still, one would much prefer to have Dame Judi Dench doing it than…. others we might mention.

Read more...

The Planets, Series Finale, BBC Two review - ice cold on Neptune

Adam Sweeting

As an aid to meditation, Professor Brian Cox’s latest series The Planets (BBC Two) could hardly be faulted. A majestic tour of the Solar System awash with computerised imagery, an eerie soundtrack and a travel budget the president of the United States might envy, it exerted a narcotic allure as Cox’s gaze roamed billions of kilometres into deep space.

Read more...

Drag SOS, Channel 4 review - absolutely fabulous

Adam Sweeting

According to the Manchester drag collective the Family Gorgeous, “drag should be for everyone.” And on the evidence of Drag SOS (Channel 4) , engagingly voice-overed by Hugh Bonneville, the British public is eager to embrace them in all their spangly, fantastical glory.

Read more...

BBC Cardiff Singer of the World 2019 Final, BBC Four review - stage confidence, supportive set-up

David Nice

If ever there was an instance of the great being the enemy of the good, it happened after all the live singing on Saturday night. This year we all remember, with sadness for his early death and amazement at his burning, burnished talent, the Siberian baritone Dmitry Hvorostovsky (1962-2017), winner in 1989.

Read more...

Beecham House, ITV review - a cartoon version of 18th century India

Adam Sweeting

It has become routine to accuse Brexiteers of wanting to bring back the British Empire (though obviously it's OK to run an empire from Brussels), but the charge might more accurately be levelled at ITV.

Read more...

Pages

Subscribe to theartsdesk.com

Thank you for continuing to read our work on theartsdesk.com. For unlimited access to every article in its entirety, including our archive of more than 10,000 pieces, we're asking for £3.95 per month or £30 per year. We feel it's a very good deal, and hope you do too.

To take an annual subscription now simply click here.

And if you're looking for that extra gift for a friend or family member, why not treat them to a theartsdesk.com gift subscription?

latest in today

Haas' Hommage à Bridget Riley, London Sinfonietta, Lubm...

Music and visual art, at least at the highest level, should go...

Giri/Haji, Series Finale, BBC Two review - a thriller, but m...

Happily, Joe Barton’s tinglingly original thriller (BBC Two)...

Honey Boy review - coming to terms with dad

Blue periods can lead to golden streaks. Such is almost the case with Honey Boy, which Shia LaBeouf wrote during a court-ordered stay in...

Ravens: Spassky vs. Fischer, Hampstead Theatre review - it...

We’ve had Chess the musical; now, here’s Chess the play...

ABBA: Super Troupers The Exhibition, O2 - one for the superg...

Abba fans can already have an immersive dining/dancing/singing experience at the O2 in Mamma Mia! The Party, and now, almost as a...

CD: Liam Payne - LP1

Liam Payne is a Simon Cowell-manufactured pop star worth...

Ordinary Love review - small but (almost) perfectly formed

Amidst the deluge of high-profile year-end releases, it would be a shame if the collective Oscar-bait noise drowned out Ordinary Love,...

Svetlana Zakharova, Modanse, London Coliseum review - impecc...

What price a pair of seats at the ballet? If you’re talking the latest starry...

Motherless Brooklyn review – tic tec

Edward Norton has wanted to adapt ...