tue 15/10/2019

tv

Studio 17: The Lost Reggae Tapes, BBC Four review - a perfectly paced tale of world-shaking basslines and human frailty

joe Muggs

If there was ever a documentary that needed you to have good speakers on your TV setup – or good headphones if you're watching on computer or tablet – this is it.

Read more...

The Capture, BBC One, series finale review - nimble drama alive with twists

Jasper Rees

What did we learn at the end of The Capture (BBC One)? A rice jar is a good place to hide USB sticks. It’s possible to withhold the opening credits for 11 whole minutes. A green coat works exceptionally well with light blue eyes and shoulder-length auburn hair.

Read more...

Doing Drugs for Fun, Channel 5 review - why the cocaine trade is no laughing matter

Adam Sweeting

Monday night’s first episode of this three-part series was a bit ordinary, as it introduced its cast of British recreational cocaine users and explained why their habit may be ill-advised.

Read more...

The Great British Bake Off, Episode 7, Channel 4 review - bakers hampered by pointless celebrities

Adam Sweeting

What’s extraordinary about Bake Off is not just the staggering complexity of the cooking challenges, but the amount of technical shenanigans that go into turning it into a finished programme (actually, spoiler-averse Channel 4 had teasingly left the ending off my preview version of this week’s show, but...

Read more...

Catherine the Great, Sky Atlantic review - a glorious role for Helen Mirren only gets better

Tom Birchenough

“I want something Russian…” It’s with such a cry that Helen Mirren, bored by the bizarrely transgressive masked ball that comes at the close of the first episode of Catherine the Great, gets the dancing going: nothing from the imported fashions of Europe will do for her, and the music duly strikes up, a soupily romantic melody on violin, the quintessence, you might think, of mythic...

Read more...

The Capture, Episode 5, BBC One review - the man who knew too much

Adam Sweeting

Five episodes ago, BBC One's The Capture set off at a cracking pace with the apparent abduction and murder of barrister Hannah Roberts by army lance-corporal Shaun Emery.

Read more...

Snackmasters, Channel 4 review - superchefs take the clone-a-KitKat challenge

Adam Sweeting

The themes of food and cookery have already been boiled until the bottom of the saucepan melted, but TV commissioning editors can’t stop searching for new twists in the formula.

Read more...

World on Fire, BBC One review - more melodrama than drama

Adam Sweeting

For his new drama series for BBC One, writer Peter Bowker (The A Word, Monroe etc) has taken as his canvas no less than a panorama of Europe in 1939, just as...

Read more...

My Life is Murder, Alibi review - whimsical tales of detection from Down Under

Adam Sweeting

Lucy Lawless achieved cult status in the Nineties fantasy classic Xena: Warrior Princess, and later became a regular in such disparate creations as Battlestar Galactica and Parks and Recreation. In My Life is Murder, she joins the ever-expanding ranks of TV ‘tecs as Melbourne-based investigator Alexa Crowe.

Read more...

Saving Lives at Sea, BBC Two review - derring-do on the ocean wave with the RNLI

Adam Sweeting

Learning support officer. Student. Chip shop owner. Mobile caterer. Gym owner. These were the day jobs of some of the volunteers featured in this week’s portfolio of tales on BBC Two from the Royal National Lifeboat Institution, who would all doubtless deny that they do anything heroic. For the people they rescue, they most certainly do.

Read more...

Pages

Subscribe to theartsdesk.com

Thank you for continuing to read our work on theartsdesk.com. For unlimited access to every article in its entirety, including our archive of more than 10,000 pieces, we're asking for £3.95 per month or £30 per year. We feel it's a very good deal, and hope you do too.

To take an annual subscription now simply click here.

And if you're looking for that extra gift for a friend or family member, why not treat them to a theartsdesk.com gift subscription?

latest in today

A History of Water in the Middle East, Royal Court review -...

Sabrina Mahfouz is a British-Egyptian writer who has explored issues of Muslim and British identity in various formats. Her work includes poetry,...

LFF 2019: The Irishman review - masterful, unsentimental gan...

Time passes slowly and remorselessly in The Irishman. Though its much remarked de-ageing technology...

Verdi Requiem, LPO, Gardner, RFH review – beyond the big noi...

You seldom expect to feel the breath of apocalypse and the terror of the grave amid the modestly rationalist architecture and passion-killer...

CD: James Arthur - You

It’s an easy joke to suggest that James Arthur needs an editor. By this point, the 31-year-old singer is almost as...

Thomas J Campanella: Brooklyn - The Once and Future City rev...

For visitors to New York, it’s all about Manhattan, its 23...

Great Women Artists review - the book we have been waiting f...

Every now and then a book comes out that can change lives. If a survey like this had appeared when I was a student at the Slade, the struggle to...

Reissue CDs Weekly: Dip - Ḣ-Camp Meets Lo-Fi

The temptation with the 20th anniversary reissue of Ḣ-Camp Meets Lo-Fi (Explosion Picture Score) is to look for traces...

Baby Reindeer, Bush Theatre review - break, break, breaking...

True stories, even in a fictional form, have the power to grip you by the throat, furiously shake your body and then give you a parting kick in...

PP Arnold, Islington Assembly Hall review - joy in a consumm...

“I had my first inter-racial relationship.” Moments after walking on stage and before the first song, PP Arnold is reminiscing about when she...