tue 20/08/2019

tv

Marianne Faithfull, BBC Four review - more than a vagabond life

Tim Cumming

French actor and director Sandrine Bonnaire’s warm, langorous film portrait of la Faithfull may not the first – that accolade goes to Michael Collins’s feature-length Dreaming my Dreams (2000), featuring Mick, Keith, Anita and John Dunbar – but it does feel like a...

Read more...

Soft Cell: Say Hello, Wave Goodbye, BBC Four review - an electro-pop celebration

Thomas H Green

“It’s never been about the success to me,” says Marc Almond, “It’s always been about the adventure.” It’s a great attitude that’s writ large over the band’s uncompromising flame-out of an early Eighties pop career.

Read more...

Strike Back: Silent War, Sky 1 review - bullets, bodies, baddies and a stolen atom bomb

Adam Sweeting

Some things never change. About 60 per cent of this first show in Strike Back’s seventh series consisted of Mac McAllister (Warren Brown) and his intrepid Section 20 squad mowing down members of a Malaysian triad gang with automatic weapons.

Read more...

This Time with Alan Partridge, BBC One review - a man out of time?

Adam Sweeting

“I’ve remained a vital presence on the fringes of TV Land,” argues Alan Partridge in an interview with Radio Times, the man whose latest claim to… well, not fame, but at least he has been presenting Mid Morning Matters on North Norfolk Digital.

Read more...

Curfew, Sky One, review - belt up for a budget-price Mad Max

Jasper Rees

Curfew (Sky One) is a new drama that begins as it means to go on, roaring from nought to 60 with a wildly implausible car chase. An electric blue McLaren is haring and weaving through London, with the law in hot pursuit. Forget the computer-generated high-speed U-turn and the armour-plated panda cars.

Read more...

Sleeping with Extremists: The Far Right, Channel 4 review - insightful but flawed documentary

Owen Richards

It’s always interesting to see how presenters make their presence known in documentaries. Louis Theroux hovers on the sidelines like an ethereal presence, Stacey Dooley connects immediately on an emotional level, and one-time host Keith Allen handled proceedings like a fight before a Millwall game.

Read more...

Traitors, Channel 4 review - Cold War thriller fails to reach room temperature

Adam Sweeting

It’s 1945 and World War Two is nearly over. Somewhere in England, Fiona Symonds (“Feef” to her friends) is training to be a spy and be dropped behind enemy lines.

Read more...

Baptiste, BBC One review - detective from The Missing gets his own hand-me-down show

Saskia Baron

Is there an algorithm for writing this review? There seems to have been one used to create Baptiste, a spin-off from The Missing, and even the staunchest fans of Tchéky Karyo will be struggling not to see the all-too-familiar formula poking through the script.

Read more...

Catastrophe, Channel 4, series 4 finale review - sitcom saves the best till last

Jasper Rees

When the third series ended with a car crash, I did wonder whether Catastrophe (Channel 4) should maybe think about calling it a day.

Read more...

Shetland, Series 5, BBC One review - uneven start to new season

Adam Sweeting

And so back to the windswept landscapes of the Shetland archipelago, where stoical DI Jimmy Perez is still keeping the bad guys at bay while continuing to cope with life as an ageing widower. You do wonder, though, how he sustains his commitment to the job in a territory offering such a restricted career ladder.

Read more...

Pages

Subscribe to theartsdesk.com

Thank you for continuing to read our work on theartsdesk.com. For unlimited access to every article in its entirety, including our archive of more than 10,000 pieces, we're asking for £3.95 per month or £30 per year. We feel it's a very good deal, and hope you do too.

To take an annual subscription now simply click here.

And if you're looking for that extra gift for a friend or family member, why not treat them to a theartsdesk.com gift subscription?

latest in today

Prom 43: Haefliger, BBCSO & Chorus, Oramo review – the f...

Time was, not long ago, when the very word “premiere” was enough to ensure a sizeable smattering of red plush holes in the Royal Albert Hall...

The Day Mountbatten Died, BBC Two review - the IRA's au...

It was a lovely summer’s day in southern England, much as it was in County Sligo. I was with my parents, driving to visit a very elderly relative...

Making new waves: Royce Vavrek on forging a libretto from La...

It was during the 1997 Golden Globe Awards telecast that I first caught a glimpse of the...

DVD/Blu-ray: The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith

Fred Schepisi’s The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith (1978) was the...

Prom 41: Ghindin, LPO, Jurowski review - perfect sound in a...

It was a Disney theme-park of Russian music, and in an entirely good way: none of the usual rides, but plenty of heroes and villains, sad spirits...

Edinburgh International Festival 2019: MacMillan birthday co...

To celebrate the 60th birthday of Sir James MacMillan, the...

CD: New Model Army - From Here

Justin Sullivan, the last remaining original member of Bradford post-...

Niall Griffiths: Broken Ghost review - Welsh visions of hope...

The trend-hopping taste-makers who run British literary publishing have lately decided that “working-class” writing merits a small dole of their...

Edinburgh International Festival 2019: Eugene Onegin, Komisc...

Returning to Edinburgh International Festival, Berlin's Komische Oper brought Barrie Kosky’s sumptuous production of Eugene Onegin to the...

Reissue CDs Weekly: Phil Manzanera - Diamond Head

Diamond Head was Roxy Music guitarist Phil Manzanera’s first solo album. Released in May...