sat 20/04/2019

tv

Wanderlust, BBC One, series finale review - you can't have your cake and eat it

Jasper Rees

So Wanderlust (BBC One) has ceased wandering and its angsty parade of characters have left a sentence unfinished for the last time. In the end, where were we, compared to where we’ve been? The final episode opened with Joy, like King Alfred, burning the pancakes. Seemingly her boats had suffered the same fate, atomised under the centrifugal forces of love and lust, but also a mass break-out of grief...

Read more...

Doctor Who, The Woman Who Fell to Earth, BBC One review - a captivating debut from Jodie Whittaker

Lisa-Marie Ferla

Re-casting a beloved character always carries a measure of risk. Solo: A Star Wars Story relied on the willingness of fans to buy in to Alden Ehrenreich as a younger incarnation of Harrison Ford: the film bombed (you know, in Star Wars terms, since it barely made $400 million).

Read more...

The Cry, BBC One review - every parent's nightmare

Adam Sweeting

Following the runaway success of Bodyguard, Jed Mercurio is no doubt popping more champagne and saying “follow that”. Stepping up to BBC One’s Sunday 9pm slot is The Cry, which transports us from suicide bombs and political intrigue and instead immerses us in the emotional plight of new mother Joanna (Jenna Coleman) and her partner Alistair (Ewen Leslie).

Read more...

Queen of the World, ITV review - born to run and run

Marina Vaizey

Awesome numbers: over a million miles, the equivalent of 42 times around the globe, have been traversed by Her Majesty the Queen, enabling visits over the past seven decades or so to 117 different countries. No one has reigned longer nor travelled further.

Read more...

Bodyguard, BBC One, series finale review - gripping entertainment of the highest calibre

Jasper Rees

And breathe. Bodyguard – not, as even some careless BBC broadcasters keep calling it, "The Bodyguard" – careered to a conclusion as if hurtling around a booby-trapped assault course.

Read more...

A Discovery of Witches, episode 2, Sky 1 review - when the sorceress met the vampire

Adam Sweeting

Witches, vampires and magicke of all descriptions continue to be big box office, so Sky 1’s new dramatisation of the first book of Deborah Harkness’s All Souls Trilogy should be finding a ready-made audience.

Read more...

Strangers, episode 2, ITV review - conspiracy theories multiply

Adam Sweeting

You might consider it odd that a man whose wife spends half the year in Hong Kong without him hasn’t managed to get around to catching a plane from Heathrow to visit her in the Far East, but that is the case with Jonah Mulray, the stressed-out protagonist of Strangers. Jonah’s excuse for his marital negligence is that he’s “scared of flying”.

Read more...

Killing Eve, BBC One review - the dying game

Adam Sweeting

It may be a sign of the times that the two lead performances in Killing Eve are female, with Jodie Comer fizzing hyperactively as shape-shifting assassin Villanelle and Sandra Oh (from Grey’s Anatomy) as British intelligence officer Eve Polastri (pictured below). Yet simultaneously, the show has a comic campness and air of fantasy that feels Sixties-like, reminiscent of such timewarp delights as The Avengers or Modesty Blaise.

Read more...

Classic Albums: Amy Winehouse - Back to Black, BBC Four review - suffering turned into song

mark Kidel

Formats are second nature to TV: the BBC and Eagle Rock’s Classic Albums will run and run. Like all formats, there’s always the risk that the medium becomes the message, and content suffers under the weight of form.

Read more...

Black Earth Rising, BBC Two review - Blick's new blockbuster

Adam Sweeting

As writer and director, Hugo Blick has brought us two of the twistiest dramas in recent-ish memory (The Shadow Line and The Honourable Woman).

Read more...

Pages

Subscribe to theartsdesk.com

Thank you for continuing to read our work on theartsdesk.com. For unlimited access to every article in its entirety, including our archive of more than 10,000 pieces, we're asking for £3.95 per month or £30 per year. We feel it's a very good deal, and hope you do too.

To take an annual subscription now simply click here.

And if you're looking for that extra gift for a friend or family member, why not treat them to a theartsdesk.com gift subscription?

latest in today

Brockes-Passion, AAM, Egarr, Barbican review - fleshly Hande...

Whips, scourges, sinews, blood and pus: where Bach’s two Passions...

SS Mendi: Dancing the Death Drill, Isango Ensemble, Linbury...

While Bach's and Handel's Passions have been driving thousands to contemplate suffering, mortality and grace, this elegy for black lives lost over...

St Matthew Passion, Ex Cathedra, Skidmore, Symphony Hall Bir...

For the final instalment of their three Matthew Passions this Holy Week, Ex Cathedra gave a large scale performance of Bach’s oratorio in their...

Red Joan review - Judi Dench can't lift lumbering espio...

The decades-long stage relationship between Judi Dench...

Take That, SSE Hydro, Glasgow review - capes and cameos in 3...

This year, says Gary Barlow, marks 30 years since five boys walked into a room in Manchester and auditioned for what...

Climate Change: The Facts, BBC One review - how much reality...

Peer down the glassy dark and you’ll see them. White bubbles trapped in the frozen lake which appear to be rising to the surface. Look through the...

Tommy Tiernan, Shepherd's Bush Empire review - playful...

Tommy Tiernan is something of an institution in his native Ireland, as a...

Loro review – hedonism must have an end

"Them" - the "loro" of the title (with a further play on “l’oro”, gold) - denotes the mostly sleazy opportunists willing to use and be used by "...