tue 05/07/2022

Classical Features

‘Slava Ukraini!’: Russian musicians worldwide show solidarity

David Nice

“You are told that we hate Russian culture,” President Zelenskyy of Ukraine informed Russians, using their language, in a speech for the ages just before the invasion, “But how can a culture be hated? Any culture? Neighbours are always enriching each other culturally. But that does not make them one entity, and does not separate people into ‘us’ and ‘them’ “.

Read more...

‘Let me be your main course’: composer Jimmy López on why new music needs time and space

Jimmy López

No, not your aperitif – and certainly not your digestif; your bona fide main dish, the one your audience yearns for, dresses up for, and looks forward to.

Read more...

First Person: Pavel Šporcl on Paganini and the Czech violin tradition

Pavel Šporcl

It is taken for granted today that Paganini is almost a God-like figure for violinists. After all, he epitomises the ultimate virtuoso figure, both as someone whose technique outshone (so we are told!) every other player of his time, and who oozed charisma.

Read more...

First Person: young composer Nicola Perikhanyan on a new immersive reality experience at London Wall

Nicola Perikhanyan

There's something really moving about standing in the centre of London Wall's Roman ruins and looking up at the city that has grown around it. Thinking about our past, present and future simultaneously. More than 2000 years have passed since the Romans created our city, and while much has changed there's still so much consistency in how our society exists, both the beauty and the flaws.

Read more...

First Person: composer Cheryl Frances-Hoad on a musical love letter to the natural world

Cheryl Frances-Hoad

 

In the darkness my dreams are interrupted

I see the blackbird in my mind 

and the whirring of my brain begins

Read more...

First Person: composer Conor Mitchell on challenging religious orthodoxy from a queer perspective in MASS

Conor Mitchell

A mass, in its simplest form, is the order of prayers that are said in a religious service. It is standardised and has been for centuries, in order to create a theatrical journey that takes us through a service. Composers have always been drawn to the mass as a structure because it has an inherent drama. It draws on themes of rebirth, change, redemption.

Read more...

Judith van Driel of the Dudok Quartet Amsterdam: 'the more we played Brahms, the more freedom we found'

Judith Van Driel

In every life there are moments of great significance. Experiences that stick with us and define our own personal story.

Read more...

'Everyone who played for him always gave their very best': remembering Bernard Haitink (1929-2021)

theartsdesk

Few musicians get to stage-manage a dignified departure from the world.

Read more...

First Person: ethnomusicologist Shumaila Hemani on global musical traditions and Concert for Afghanistan

Shumaila Hemani

In early 2020, the year that soon saw  COVID-19 lockdown, I served on the music faculty for Semester at Sea, Spring 2020 voyage, where I taught self-designed courses on global music cultures as well as a course called Soundscapes.

Read more...

First Person: pianist Filippo Gorini on head, heart and the contemporary in Bach's 'The Art of Fugue'

Filippo Gorini

A past work of art either still speaks to us in the present, or it is dead. To try and understand a masterpiece, we tend to look at its past: we study it, analyse it, read biographies of the artist behind it and chronicles of its historical background. But it is even more interesting to see what happened to the work after it was finished. What did it mean to the following generations, and, more critically, what does it mean to us today?

Read more...

Pages

latest in today

Jessie Burton: The House of Fortune review - a muted, sensit...

A sequel is always a hard thing to write, especially if the book that precedes it is a bestseller, adapted for television and read by more than a...

Album: Viagra Boys - Cave World

The third album from Stockholm rowdies Viagra Boys doesn’t muck about with what they do, but it’s more persistently punkin’ than their last. There...

Mick Jagger: My Life as a Rolling Stone review, BBC Two - th...

At the beginning of this film, Mick Jagger says: “What most...

Alcina, Glyndebourne review - Handel on the strand

Reviewing the Grange Festival production of Tamerlano the other day, I noted the difficulty...

Favour, Bush Theatre review - Ambreen Razia's punchy ne...

Where should Leila live — Ilford or Kent? It doesn’t sound like an earth-shattering decision for a 15-year-old to make, but the stakes...

Album: Laura Veirs - Found Light

The last minute of Found Light’s third track “Seaside Haiku” is defined by the repetition of a single phrase: “give but don’t give too...

Music Reissues Weekly: Ferkat Al Ard - Oghneya

Oghneya opens with the extraordinary “Matar Al Sabah.” Jazzy, with an overt Brazilian feel it gently swings and swoons....

The Making of Pinocchio, LIFT 2022, Battersea Arts Centre re...

Pinocchio is one of our most irreverent metamorphosis stories, and in this visually ingenious blend of...

The Undeclared War, Channel 4 review - how would the UK cope...

As the world lurches ever deeper into multiple manifestations of chaos,...