wed 21/08/2019

New Music Reviews

Reissue CDs Weekly: Phil Manzanera - Diamond Head

Kieron Tyler

Diamond Head was Roxy Music guitarist Phil Manzanera’s first solo album. Released in May 1975 and recorded the previous December and January during a lull in his parent band’s activities, it hit shops between Roxy’s Country Life and Siren albums. Singer Bryan Ferry had done a short solo tour in December 1974 which culminated with a show at The Royal Albert Hall where he was backed by an orchestra.

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Foo Fighters, Bellahouston Park, Glasgow - communal singalongs and career highlights

Lisa-Marie Ferla

Foo Fighters are an unlikely candidate for one of the biggest bands in the world. There’s nothing workmanlike about the sheer joy with which Dave Grohl and drummer Taylor Hawkins approach playing live.

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Pram, Hare & Hounds, Birmingham review - a fine hometown return for the psychedelic oddballs

Guy Oddy

While Pram could hardly be described as representative of the UK psychedelic scene, it would be hard to imagine South Birmingham’s favourites being birthed by any other sub-culture.

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Josienne Clarke, Green Note review - world-class melancholia hits its mark

Tim Cumming

It’s been a period of upheaval and change for singer-songwriter, and compelling interpreter of traditional ballads, Josienne Clarke. These days she’s a Rough Trade artist, now sailing solo seas away from her long-time musical partner, producer and arranger Ben Walker.

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CD: Frank Turner - No Man's Land

Nick Hasted

Frank Turner’s compendium of extraordinary female lives, from the “impudence” of a Byzantine princess to his mum via Mata Hari, is admirably ambitious and historically intriguing. The arena-playing folk-punk digs deeper into factual byways than he has any career need to, insisting on his own wayward course.

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theartsdesk in Oslo: Øya Festival 2019 review

Kieron Tyler

The timing seemed odd. Sigrid is internationally successful. She’s Norway’s highest-profile musical ambassador since a-ha. Yet instead of headlining at 2019’s Øya Festival, she hits the stage at 6.45.

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Reissue CDs Weekly: Come On Let's Go!

Kieron Tyler

The core paradox with powerpop is that most of those who sought to create the perfect guitar driven, hook-laden pop song failed to score hits. Come On Let's Go! – Power Pop Gems From the 70s & 80s is stuffed with the classy and memorable, but under a third of its 24 participants had any sort of chart profile.

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Johnny Marr, Royal Festival Hall review - rock royalty having the time of his life

Ellie Porter

Nile Rodgers, the beaming, beret-sporting curator of this year’s splendidly eclectic Meltdown, strolls on to the Royal Festival Hall stage tonight to introduce his “dearest friend in the world”.

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The National, Kelvingrove Bandstand, Glasgow review - rapture, catharsis and jokes

Lisa-Marie Ferla

With their claustrophobic melodies and cryptic lyrics, The National are not the most obvious of choices for a summer evening. But then, The National of 2019 are not the same band. On recent album I Am Easy to Find, frontman Matt Berninger’s signature baritone is often on the periphery, while female voices take the lead.

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Wilderness Festival 2019 review - marvellous misbehaviour

Katie Colombus

The thing about Wilderness is that it’s just so jolly decent. Acres of decadence, sprawled safely over the yawning magnificence of Cornbury Park, Oxfordshire, combine to create a scintillating country fair reverie – a heady mix of good music, high end food, luxury outdoorsyness and companionable folk.

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