thu 19/09/2019

New Music Reviews

Reissue CDs Weekly: Jeanette

Kieron Tyler

Jeanette’s “Porque Te Vas” is a prime example of a type of Europop which – beyond a brief flirtation around 1968 to 1971: think Clodagh Rogers – Britain had little time for. It’s not quite schlager, but still has the tell-tale martial rhythm. The singing voice conforms with the breathy stereotype still favoured in France.

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Michael Bublé, O2 Review – an entertainer second to none

Sebastian Scotney

“How did all these people get in my room?” the greatest crooner of them all once quipped, as he threaded his way through the Count Basie Orchestra and out onto the stage at The Sands in Las Vegas. But whereas Sinatra in 1966 had to convince an audience of just 600 people that they were seeing an intimate show, Michael Bublé sets himself the task of doing the same for 20,000.

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Emmy the Great, King Tut's Wah Wah Hut, Glasgow review - emotions recollected

Lisa-Marie Ferla

“I appreciate the irony of me singing this in my mum jeans,” says Emmy The Great, whose five-month-old is travelling with her on this tour, before playing “We Almost Had a Baby”. Despite its jaunty little riff the song, from her 10-year-old debut album, is a desperately sad one, about a pregnancy scare.

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Mélanie De Biasio, QEH review – six years after 'No Deal'

Sebastian Scotney

“Alexa, play Mélanie De Biasio”... and you know exactly where you’re headed. The Charleroi-born singer has created a sound-world, a place which is instantly recognisable.

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Neneh Cherry, Brighton Festival 2019 review – beloved bohemian

Nick Hasted

Neneh Cherry’s matchless bohemian life has perversely secured her pop position. The crowd tonight is maybe three-quarters female, and as unconcerned by a setlist almost wholly drawn from new album Broken Politics as Cherry is by the long lacuna in what you could hardly call a career.

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Peter Perrett, Concorde 2, Brighton review - it’s a family affair for the former Only One

Guy Oddy

It’s been a couple of years since Peter Perrett, the former frontman and creative force behind the much loved but commercially under-performing Only Ones decided that he’d had enough of being a mere legend and got back into the musical ring.

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Manic Street Preachers, Usher Hall, Edinburgh review - 20th anniversary tour lets underrated songs shine

Lisa-Marie Ferla

Nothing brings home the difference between sequencing an album and sequencing a live show like going to see a classic album played in its entirety.

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Mariah Carey, Royal Albert Hall review – fervent worshippers in Mariah-heaven

Sebastian Scotney

The sheer scale of the Mariah Carey phenomenon is truly astounding. Since the release of her first album in 1990, she has now clocked up worldwide album sales of over 200 million, and had 18 US Number One singles. Also – and far less frequently mentioned – she is actually third in the list of songwriters with the most chart-topping singles, and sixth in the list of producers.

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The Strokes, All Points East Festival review - let them entertain you

Chris Harvey

Back in 2001, after the release of their debut album This Is It, The Strokes weren’t just the most fashionable band in the world, they were also regarded as the group that could “save rock”. That was asking quite a lot.

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Reissue CDs Weekly: Bernard Herrmann

Kieron Tyler

Debates about whether 1964’s Marnie presaged Alfred Hitchcock’s downslide as a force will run and run.

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