sun 29/05/2022

Sarah Kent

Sarah Kent's picture
Bio
Sarah was the visual arts editor art of Time Out, the ICA’s Director of Exhibitions, has served on Turner Prize and other juries, and has written catalogues for the Hayward, ICA, Saatchi Gallery, White Cube and Haunch of Venison and books such as Shark-Infested Waters: The Saatchi Collection of British Art in the 90s.

Articles By Sarah Kent

Cornelia Parker, Tate Britain review – divine intelligence

Read more...

Walter Sickert, Tate Britain review - all the world's a stage

Read more...

Ali Cherri: If you prick us, do we not bleed?, National Gallery review - cabinets of curiosity

Read more...

River review – gorgeous visuals and a timely message: so what’s not to like?

Read more...

The Metamorphosis of Birds review - picture perfect

Read more...

Surrealism Beyond Borders, Tate Modern review - a disappointing mish mash

Read more...

Postwar Modern: New Art in Britain 1945-65, Barbican review - revelations galore

Read more...

A Century of the Artist's Studio, Whitechapel Gallery review - a voyeur's delight

Read more...

Louise Bourgeois: The Woven Child, Hayward Gallery review - the wife, the mistress, the daughter and the art that came out of it

Read more...

America in Crisis, Saatchi Gallery review - a country in jeopardy

Read more...

Francis Bacon: Man and Beast, Royal Academy review – a life lived in extremis

Read more...

Kehinde Wiley, National Gallery review - more than meets the eye

Read more...

Lubaina Himid, Tate Modern review – more explication please

Read more...

Waste Age, Design Museum review - too little too lame

Read more...

Yoko Ono, Mend Piece, Whitechapel Gallery review – funny and sad in equal measure

Read more...

Theaster Gates - A Clay Sermon, Whitechapel Gallery review - mud, mud, glorious mud

Read more...

Pages

latest in today

Music Reissues Weekly: John Barry - The More Things Change

By 1970, John Barry had composed music for Born Free, The Lion in Winter, Midnight Cowboy, You Only Live Twice...

Elizabeth: A Portrait in Parts review - she is a human being

Roger Michell’s films described a range of Englishness, from Notting Hill’s foppish comedy to acerbically humane Hanif Kureishi scripts...

Girl on an Altar, Kiln Theatre review - machismo, murder and...

Playwrights return to classical myths for two main reasons – to shine a light on how we live today and because they're bloody good yarns.

...

First Person: Christina McMaster - seeking musical cures for...

In 2020, during a gentle easing of lockdown restrictions, I was asked to play for the Culture Clinic sessions at Kings Place, a creative...

Album: Yama Warashi - Crispy Moon

Crispy Moon is a musical kaleidoscope encompassing free-jazz skronk,...

Between Two Worlds review - Juliette Binoche, maid in Franc...

For die-hard Juliette Binoche fans – don’t cross us, we get angry – Between Two Worlds is heaven. The...

Samson et Dalila, Royal Opera review - from austerity to exc...

Words and situations are one-dimensional, but the music is chameleonic, if not profound, and crafted with a master’s hand. What to do about ...

Henry VIII, Shakespeare's Globe review - unashamedly vu...

Boris Johnson was of course not the first British leader to engineer a split with Europe for...

Luzzu review - a Maltese fisherman struggles with modernity

In Maltese-American Alex Camilleri’s debut feature, it’s a case of follow the swordfish. This terrifically atmospheric, almost documentary-like...