fri 24/09/2021

Sarah Kent

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Bio
Sarah was the visual arts editor art of Time Out, the ICA’s Director of Exhibitions, has served on Turner Prize and other juries, and has written catalogues for the Hayward, ICA, Saatchi Gallery, White Cube and Haunch of Venison and books such as Shark-Infested Waters: The Saatchi Collection of British Art in the 90s.

Articles By Sarah Kent

Zanele Muholi, Tate Modern review - photography as protest

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One Man and His Shoes review - beautifully crafted, fast-paced documentary

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Sin, National Gallery review - great subject, modest show

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Bruce Nauman, Tate Modern review - the human condition writ large in neon

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Hendrix and the Spook review - a search for clarity in murky waters

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Léon Spilliaert, Royal Academy review - a maudlin exploration of solitude

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Among the Trees, Hayward Gallery review - a mixture of euphoria and dismay

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Nicolaes Maes: Dutch Master of the Golden Age, National Gallery review – beautifully observed vignettes

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Push review – lifting the lid on the housing crisis

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Masculinities: Liberation through Photography, Barbican review – a must-see exhibition

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Steve McQueen, Tate Modern review – films that stick in the mind

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Radical Figures: Painting in the New Millennium, Whitechapel review - ten distinctive voices

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Darren Waterston: Filthy Lucre, V&A review - a timely look at the value of art

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Imran Perretta, Chisenhale Gallery review - a deeply affecting film

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Eco-Visionaries, Royal Academy review - wakey, wakey!

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Lucian Freud: The Self-Portraits, Royal Academy review - mesmerising intensity

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Pages

latest in today

Barry Adamson: Up Above the City, Down Beneath the Stars rev...

For those not familiar with the murkier corners of British rock music history, Barry Adamson was a significant player in creating the post-punk...

The Ballad of Billy McCrae review - beware the quarryman...

An entertaining but undernourished industrial-domestic neo-noir set in South Wales,The Ballad of Billy McCrae depicts the power struggle...

Album: Amon Tobin - How Do You Live

Amon Tobin is hard to pin down. His music has mutated over the years. He initially fit in with Ninja Tune’s late-Nineties/early-Noughties roster...

Album: Nao - And Then Life Was Beautiful

Neo Jessica Joshua, better known as Nao, has been consistently putting out good – often excellent – music...

Blithe Spirit, Harold Pinter Theatre review - an amusing, if...

We’re in an agreeable drawing room with an author, Charles Condomine, who is looking forward to having a bit of fun with a local...

Kanneh-Mason, Terfel, RPO, Philharmonia Chorus, Petrenko, RA...

75 years after Sir Thomas Beecham founded the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, it’s sobering to reflect that without this one person’s hubris and...

Thomas Hardy: Fate, Exclusion and Tragedy, Sky Arts review –...

Born in 1840, Thomas Hardy lived a life of in-betweens. Modern yet traditional, the son of a builder who went on to become a famous...

Mixing it Up, Hayward Gallery review - a glorious celebratio...

The 31 artists in Mixing it Up all live in this country, but a third of them were born elsewhere – in countries including Belgium, China...

Album: Lindsey Buckingham - Lindsey Buckingham

Lindsey Buckingham was last in and first out of Fleetwood Mac’s...