sat 13/04/2024

Marina Vaizey

Marina Vaizey's picture
Bio
Marina Vaizey was art critic for the Financial Times, then the Sunday Times, edited the Art Quarterly, has been a judge for the Turner Prize, and a trustee of several museums; books include 100 Masterpieces, The Artist as Photographer and Great Women Collectors. She's currently a freelance art critic and lecturer. This drawing of Marina as a character from Jane Austen is 40 years old.

Articles By Marina Vaizey

Pioneering Women, Oxford Ceramics Gallery online review - domestic pleasures

Read more...

Hold Still, National Portrait Gallery review - snapshots from lockdown

Read more...

Extinction: The Facts, BBC One review - David Attenborough tells a devastating story

Read more...

William Feaver: The Lives of Lucian Freud: Fame 1968-2011 review - mesmerising, exhaustive and obsessively detailed

Read more...

George IV: Art & Spectacle, The Queen's Gallery review - all is aglitter

Read more...

Vincent van Gogh: the reader and the writer

Read more...

Bears About the House, BBC Two review - uphill struggle to save hunted animals

Read more...

Tutankhamun in Colour, BBC Four review - amazing enhanced images bring fabled Pharaoh to life

Read more...

The World's Greatest Paintings, Channel 5 review - enthusiastic presenter but no dazzling revelations

Read more...

John Grisham: Camino Winds review - morality tale with a light touch

Read more...

Caroline Maclean: Circles and Squares review - adventurous art, progressive living and a good gossip

Read more...

Grayson's Art Club, Channel 4 review - too many clichés and platitudes?

Read more...

Don Winslow: Broken review - a staggering crash course in the possibilities of crime

Read more...

Mark Kermode's Secrets of Cinema, BBC Four review - the undying allure of the spying game

Read more...

Sam Bourne: To Kill a Man review – the woman who fought back

Read more...

Taking Control: The Dominic Cummings Story, BBC Two review - disruptive political maverick eludes pigeonholing

Read more...

Pages

latest in today

Album: A Certain Ratio - It All Comes Down to This

After a long period of relative inactivity, the last five years has had A Certain Ratio getting the bit between their teeth, trying out new sounds...

Back to Black review - rock biopic with a loving but soft to...

Sam Taylor-Johnson has fashioned her biopic of Amy Winehouse with great care and affection, but sometimes, as she shows her subject...

Sheku Kanneh-Mason, Philharmonia Chorus, RPO, Petrenko, RFH...

Purple patches flourished in the first half of this admirable programme: it could hardly have been otherwise given Sheku Kanneh-Mason’s devotion...

Six Chick Flicks, Leicester Square Theatre review - funny, f...

Spoofing movies or movie genres has been done before, but Six Chick Flicks goes the extra mile. It's a funny, frenetic and...

Civil War review - God help America

Alex Garland’s fourth movie as writer/director is a chilling glimpse of an...

The Teachers' Lounge - teacher-pupil relationships unde...

The Teachers’ Lounge should really have been translated into English as The Staffroom, but that’s a minor gripe. Focussing on a...

Album: Maggie Rogers - Don't Forget Me

For the past almost two years, Maggie Rogers has taken an unexpectedly special place in my heart and musical tastes. Upon reviewing her previous...

Aci by the River, London Handel Festival, Trinity Buoy Wharf...

“Site-specific” performance locations rarely come more atmospheric, or evocative, than this one. Beyond the East India Dock basin, with the...

Daphnis et Chloé, Tenebrae, LSO, Pappano, Barbican review -...

Antonio Pappano fervently believes that talking about music is a vital part of his communicative art, and nobody does it better. Given that the...