wed 19/06/2019

Visual Arts Reviews

Rose Wylie: Quack Quack, Serpentine Gallery - anarchy at 83

Sarah Kent

Three years ago Rose Wylie won the prestigious John Moore’s Painting Prize. She was 80 years old and had been painting away in relative obscurity for many decades. You might suppose, then, that the prize was given in recognition of past achievements – a reward for dogged perseverance.

Read more...

Modigliani, Tate Modern review - the pitfalls of excess

Katherine Waters

Modigliani was an addict. Booze, fags, absinthe, hash, cocaine, women. He lived fast, died young, cherished an idea of what an artist should be and pursued it to his death. His nickname, Modi, played on the idea of the artiste maudit – the figure of the artist as wretched, damned.

Read more...

The Machines of Steven Pippin, The Edge, University of Bath review - technology as poetry

Sarah Kent

Our universe seems to be in a state of equilibrium, neither collapsing in on itself nor expanding ad infinitum. The metaphor used by physicists to represent the delicate balance of forces needed to maintain this happy state of affairs is a pencil standing on its tip. In his sculpture Omega = 1, Steven Pippin miraculously turns the metaphor into physical reality.

Read more...

Lake Keitele: A Vision of Finland review, National Gallery - light-filled northern vistas

Marina Vaizey

Finland is celebrating its centenary this year and the National Gallery's exhibition of four paintings by Akseli Gallen-Kalela (1865-1931) of a very large lake in central Finland is a beguiling glimpse of the passion its inhabitants attach to its scenic beauty, in winter darkness and here, summer night. Finland possesses almost 190,000 lakes, depending on your definition.

Read more...

Highlights from the Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize 2017 - raw emotion, not always human

Bill Knight

What does it take to be included in the Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize exhibition? This year 2,423 photographers entered 5,717 images: 2,373 of those photographers are left wondering what it takes to make the grade.

Read more...

Red Star Over Russia, Tate Modern review – fascinating history in a nutshell

Sarah Kent

Ilya and Emilia Kabakov’s Tate Modern exhibition features an installation made in 1985 of a Moscow bedsit, its walls lined with political posters.

Read more...

Impressionists in London, Tate Britain review - from the stodgy to the sublime

Marina Vaizey

Jules Dalou, Edouard Lantéri, Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux, Charles-François Daubigny, Alphonse Legros, Giuseppe de Nittis?

Read more...

Age of Terror: Art Since 9/11, Imperial War Museum review - affecting but incoherent

Katherine Waters

The Imperial War Museum’s Age of Terror: Art since 9/11 brings together art made in response to the immediate events and long-term consequences of the events of 11 September.

Read more...

Monochrome, National Gallery review - colourless but not dreary

Florence Hallett

Might a painting ever achieve the veracity of a sculpture, a "real" object in space that we can walk around and view from every angle? Could the documentary quality of an engraving ever be equalled by a painting? And how could painting respond to photography – drawing with light – an invention that in the 19th century prompted a thorough reconsideration of painting’s purpose.

Read more...

Cézanne Portraits, National Portrait Gallery review - eye-opening and heart-breaking

Marina Vaizey

Some 50 portraits by Paul Cézanne – almost a third of all those the artist painted that have survived – are on view in this quietly sensational exhibition.

Read more...

Pages

Subscribe to theartsdesk.com

Thank you for continuing to read our work on theartsdesk.com. For unlimited access to every article in its entirety, including our archive of more than 10,000 pieces, we're asking for £3.95 per month or £30 per year. We feel it's a very good deal, and hope you do too.

To take an annual subscription now simply click here.

And if you're looking for that extra gift for a friend or family member, why not treat them to a theartsdesk.com gift subscription?

latest in today

Download Festival: downpours can't dampen spirits at me...

Download is Britain’s premier metal festival, attended by all ages. Theartsdesk’s three person team offer up their reviews of one day each, as...

Years and Years, Series Finale, BBC One review - soggy endin...

As Russell T Davies’s doomsday odyssey reached its endgame...

Soweto Kinch, Jazz Cafe review - instant karma in Camden

Camden’s Jazz Cafe reverberated to the sounds of a 50-year-old spiritual...

Cutting Edge: Modernist British Printmaking, Dulwich Picture...

Under a turbulent sky racked with jagged clouds suggesting bolts of lightning, pale figures hurl themselves into a spitting expanse of water....

Citysong, Soho Theatre review - big writing, big heart

Irish playwright Dylan Coburn Gray's new play won...

Milton Nascimento, Barbican review – besotted audience hails...

Milton Nascimento is 76. Physically, he is quite frail; he had to be helped carefully onto the stage and then up into a high stool for this London...

Ackley Bridge, Series 3, Channel 4 review - we gotta get out...

In the Yorkshire town of Ackley Bridge, education is like...

The Best Plays in London

London is the theatre capital of the world, with more than 50 playhouses offering theatrical entertainment. From the mighty National Theatre to...

CD: Hot Chip - A Bath Full of Ecstasy

Nineteen years, seven albums and untold side projects into their career, Hot Chip have for the first time enlisted outside producers: Rodaidh...